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  1. #1
    Former Moderator a4twenty's Avatar
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    Question need to make a large dado?

    i have a guy that wants a custom entertainment centre / book case. he has decided that he wants it made from actual 1" wood and would like it to be put together using dado's because he likes the look.

    the dado blade for my table saw won't do 1" wide in a single pass and would be awkward doing multiple passes with the long narrow sides anyway.

    i have a 2HP router and figure i could run a 1" double fluted carbide straight bit, using a jig and get the 1/4" - 3/8" depth in two passes without having to move the jig. there is also a 1" ( 1" x 15/32", nice and short so not to much side pressure ) bottom cleaning bit that looks like it would work pretty good ( except it looks like it may be tapered in the catalogue )

    my question is, is there any disadvantage to using a plunge bit for routing slots? i think i would prefer to get the plunge bit because i can see using it for more stuff than just a regular 1" straight cutter.

    PS:which ever one i get it will with a 1/2" shank.


    thanks for any info or opinion you have.
    `

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  2. #2
    Moderator ShipWreck's Avatar
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    As long as the plunge bit isn't tapered then I would use it. This gives you the ability to easily create a blind dato as well if you need.
    Rob
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    Upgrade in the works! Keep looking for an update.


  3. #3
    liv
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    Former Moderator liv's Avatar
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    I see no trouble with that either.
    1" solid wood.. nice !

    moving.. so temporarily out of SW :b8:
    planning next tank, possibly 60x30x20 on 2x plasma.
    updated: 2011/05/30

  4. #4
    Former Moderator a4twenty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShipWreck View Post
    This gives you the ability to easily create a blind dato as well if you need.
    exactly my reasoning, they say they're straight bits, it was only the clean out that looks tapered. not it the diagram of the bit but in the actual photo but i guess it could be on an angle in the photo. the reason i'm considering that one is that the short flute length ( is 15/31" opposed to 1 1/2" for the others ) will greatly reduce the side pressure.

    Quote Originally Posted by liv View Post
    I see no trouble with that either.
    1" solid wood.. nice !
    yeah, it will be nice. we are meeting with my exotic wood guy middle of this week and then to the mill. he may be in for a huge shock ( not that i didn't warn him ) but he didn't flinch when i gave him the price for his 3" thick solid wood counter top :b2:

    thanks for the replies guys, and anyone with any thing else to add please do.
    `

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  5. #5
    liv
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    I will need some pics he he he

    moving.. so temporarily out of SW :b8:
    planning next tank, possibly 60x30x20 on 2x plasma.
    updated: 2011/05/30

  6. #6
    Former Moderator a4twenty's Avatar
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    i will try to, it just never ends. i lost lot of electronic equipment during a lightning storm earlier this year ( computer equipment, pumps, etc ....... ) and on top of that my truck died so the bills just never stop. but i think with the holidays coming it may be time to fix the comp and camera. and i love my new truck, so i guess it wasn't all bad :b2:
    `

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  7. #7
    Senior Member reefmania's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by a4twenty View Post

    my question is, is there any disadvantage to using a plunge bit for routing slots?


    thanks for any info or opinion you have.
    I am not sure what you mean by a plunge bit. There are bits that have both the bottom and the side cutters which will do the job cleanly. see http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...168,46173&ap=1 There are also spiral cutter bits which can be used to easily plunge. However, if you get the upcut spiral, you will get tearout on the face that you are cutting, particularly if you are working a long grain wood such as oak. A down cut bit eliminates this problem. I would personally use the straight cut.

  8. #8
    Former Moderator a4twenty's Avatar
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    i like the way you think, here i am going through the LV catalogue when i could have be browsing it on the web.

    that link is to the plunge bits, here is the one to the regular straight cutters and the clean out bit.

    http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...168,46171&ap=1
    http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...168,46171&ap=1

    the difference is a plunge bit can cut going down ( vertically ) into the material and the regular straight cut bits can only cut horizontally.

    i was wondering if there was any reason not to use a plunge to cut grooves?
    `

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  9. #9
    Senior Member reefmania's Avatar
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    The plunge bit will work for a dado/groove. I use these in my shop for dado cuts. If you don't see the need to plunge cut in the future, you can save money by just getting the straight cut. The staight bit does not have the bottom cutter and costs about half of what the plunge bit costs. The sides are parallel on both so there wont be an issue.

    On the other hand, I have fouind that if I get a new bit, I always find new things to do. As someone suggested earlier, plunge cutters allow you to make stopped dados. The straight cutter will not.

    I am not sure if the bottom cleaner bit is tapered. Like you, it appears that it is. I personnaly would not use it for plunge cutting.

  10. #10
    Former Moderator a4twenty's Avatar
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    cool, thanks for the info.

    we could only get either 1" or 2" so there wouldn't be enough room to clean up the 1" and to much waste to bring the 2" down. he decided to go with some 1" x 12" knotty pine ( we're gonna distress it and he wants lots of character ) instead that we are going to have cleaned up to 3/4" x 11 1/2". it should still be nice but nowhere near as nice as it was going to be :b1:
    `

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