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  1. #1
    Senior Member Flame*Angel's Avatar
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    Bacterial infections

    I lost a small raccoon butterfly in my quarantine tank last night. I'm 99% sure he had an external bacterial infection. When he arrived (after an awful 40+ shipping time) he had a small area of missing scales on one side that looked like some minor damage from the orignal capture. Over the course of the week the scales on area became raised and the area of raised scales became larger and larger. The last couple days I could see blood at the base of the raised scales. The last day he stopped eating.

    I treated the tank with Neoplex, an antiobiotic, but I suspect it was just too late.

    There were no other symptoms.

    I'm wondering if there is anything more I could have done. It's too late for this fish but it would be good to know if I ever get a fish in this situation again.
    Susan

  2. #2
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    Sorry to hear about that Susan but you likely could do little about it once the condition was even noticeable.
    This was most likely a bacterial scale infection (Pseudomonas species). It is considered as being "barely" if at all infectious. This form of bacterial infection spreads quickly and more often then not ends with sudden death. Usually within 24 hours of being noticed. It is sometimes accompanied by a swollen belly.
    If noticed VERY early it will respond to copper treatment but the preferred treatment is with streptomycin.
    Rob

  3. #3
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    Originally posted by One Salty Dog
    Sorry to hear about that Susan but you likely could do little about it once the condition was even noticeable.
    This was most likely a bacterial scale infection (Pseudomonas species). It is considered as being "barely" if at all infectious. This form of bacterial infection spreads quickly and more often then not ends with sudden death. Usually within 24 hours of being noticed. It is sometimes accompanied by a swollen belly.
    If noticed VERY early it will respond to copper treatment but the preferred treatment is with streptomycin.
    Rob
    OSD, Where are you pulling this information from?

    You sound like the equivalent of a doctor, but for fish

    -yvest

  4. #4
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    goth .. I am referencing my information from a rather old book on the hobby that was prepared by Frank de Graaf. At the time of the writing He was the curator of the Artis Aquarium of the Royal Zoological Society in Amsterdam. He has done extensive studies into the diseases of Marine fish and for that matter many other marine topics. The book is old (copy right in 1968) but just like the chemistry of the aquarium .. the diseases have not changes. This book even back then has information about ALL aspects of keeping marine fish and invertebrates. It is my proverbial bible on our hobby.
    Rob

  5. #5
    Senior Member Flame*Angel's Avatar
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    Thanks Rob. I have cupramine here too but didn't think to use it for a bacterial infection. I do feel somewhat better knowing that it was probably already too late though. It was definitely a scale infection and it happened very quickly. When you say it's barely if at all infectious does that mean not likely contagious? Just want to be clear because I have another little butterfly from the same order still in the same quarantine tank. She doesn't have any signs of it at all.

    That sounds like a great book!
    Susan

  6. #6
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    That's what I mean Susan. This type of bacteria is not considered to be very contagious. The book says "If even contagious barely so" Cause was listed as unknown at the time but believed to be related to and similar to dropsy in fresh water fish.
    Rob

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by One Salty Dog
    goth .. I am referencing my information from a rather old book on the hobby that was prepared by Frank de Graaf. At the time of the writing He was the curator of the Artis Aquarium of the Royal Zoological Society in Amsterdam. He has done extensive studies into the diseases of Marine fish and for that matter many other marine topics. The book is old (copy right in 1968) but just like the chemistry of the aquarium .. the diseases have not changes. This book even back then has information about ALL aspects of keeping marine fish and invertebrates. It is my proverbial bible on our hobby.
    Rob
    OSD, That's cool. How did you came up with this book? I'm guessing that you have been using it for a long time.

    BTW, do you know of any more recent books in this field. Specifically on treating marine fish? Any idea if alot of the treatements are out of date (things must have evolved somewhat since, no?)

    Thanks,

    -yvest

  8. #8
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    Goth .. The book was given to me by an old reefer who got me into the hobby many years ago. He has actually passed away since then. Anyway I don't think things have changed a whole lot. There are no doubt different ways to treat some of the bacterial infections but these methods are tried and true even if basic. It is much the same with antibiotics used in the medical Field. Tried and true penicillin for example has been around and will be around for a long time, even as new drugs are discovered. Often times there is more then one way to treat a given disease and sometimes one will work better then another. Absolute identification of the bacterial infections we see affecting our fish would be way too costly so we are left with broad spectrum treatment drugs. When I seek additional information I use the Internet. To date any time I have gone looking for more up to date information about treatments I discover that in deed things have not changed very much at all over the years. It has not advanced nearly as much as has the development of drugs to treat our dogs and cats. Because this book covers everything I have seen to date in my tank I have not acquired any newer books.
    Rob

  9. #9
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    Thanks Rob. No signs of sickness in the auriga so far. I don't think she's going to get a bacterial infection.
    Susan

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