Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    116

    How to prevent jumpers??

    I proudly installed my new lighting on Friday, removing the glass canopy, and marvelling at how great the new lights brighten the tank.

    Apparently, my new young clown fish saw the light as well, and took a leap of faith, unfortunately, not landing back in the tank. Instead, landing on the carpet, with no one around to save it.

    Is there any way that I can prevent future fish loss from jumpers??

  2. #2
    Senior Member Nelson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    552
    Quote Originally Posted by emahoney View Post
    I proudly installed my new lighting on Friday, removing the glass canopy, and marvelling at how great the new lights brighten the tank.

    Apparently, my new young clown fish saw the light as well, and took a leap of faith, unfortunately, not landing back in the tank. Instead, landing on the carpet, with no one around to save it.

    Is there any way that I can prevent future fish loss from jumpers??
    Egg crate...keeps jumpers in the tank and allows for air circulation so there's no overheating.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Zookeeper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,180
    Yep, eggcrate. Also known as "light diffusing tiles". Look for it in the drop ceiling supply section of your local Home Depot or Rona.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    612
    You can get them black or white, or even some kind of silver colour. I went with black since it matches the tank bracing. The black one is threw the roof expensive at rona ( if I remember correctly ) so I think home depot is your best bet.

    I'm curious was to why your clown jumped out.
    120g AGA~145 lbs Haitian LR~DA Reef Keeper 2 Controller~Dual 14k 250 DE MH's~Dual Overflows~Dual 250w Jager Heaters~Dual 96W Actinics~30g Sump/Refugium~Mag 12 Return~140 lbs Reefgrade Caribsea Aragonite~BubbleKing 180 Skimmer~Phosban Reactor~GEO Kalk Reactor~Powerheads:MP40w/Seio 820/modified Powersweep 270 with Hydor rotating deflector~Digital lighting timer for moon/fuge lighting~7 stage RODI filtration~Quarantine: modified 12.5g Marineland Eclipse

  5. #5
    Former Moderator a4twenty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,819
    the white may not match the bracing but would work better to reflect and diffuse the light, they are also directional ( wide side up works best ).
    `

    120S RR tank with 60G basement sump / fuge

    Return Pump: Little Giant 4-MDQX SC
    Water Movement: MP40W, Seio 1500, (2) Hydor K4's
    Lighting: 400W SE MH with 10K Venture
    Skimmer: Euro-Reef RS250 with gate valve
    Other: RODI, RDSB, PO4/AC reactor


    My Gallery

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    116
    Egg crate... simple, yet effective.
    Thanks for the info. I'll be picking some up today.
    58 gallon display, 20 gallon sump, Octopus Recirc 110, Mag9 return. Nova Extreme lighting.
    55lbs live rock.
    Yellow Tang, 2 Clowns, Kupang Damsel, Yellow Watchmen.


    24 gallon AquaPod, 24lbs live rock.
    Valentini Toby, Coral Beauty, various snails, hermits.


    12 gallon AquaPod, 12lbs live rock, lots of mushrooms.

  7. #7
    Senior Member percula99's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    618
    I would love to keep some yellow wrasses. I have in the past but they ended up on the carpet also, so I swore off them. I had considered egg crate, but thought it would block out too much light. The further to the side the light reflects from the bulb, the greater the angle and the more of the egg crate blocks the light. Would the users of egg crate agree or disagree with this? Thanks.
    180 gallon reef. 230 lbs live rock. Mostly LPS and softies with increasing numbers of SPS. Desjardini Tang, Purple Tang, Powder Blue, Heniochus, Ocellaris clowns, chromis and a mandarin. 3- 250 watt 10000K metal halide lights with 2 VHO actinics.

  8. #8
    Moderator ShipWreck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,213
    Instead of laying the egg crate on top of the tank and blocking some light I used it to build a wall around the top of the tank about 7-8" tall. I found a few dabs of Silicone I around the trim at the back and sides will hold it nicely with a couple of tie wraps at the corners. At the front a couple pieces of scrap acrylic can create a slide area so the front piece can be dropped into place and easily removed.
    Rob
    -----
    Upgrade in the works! Keep looking for an update.


  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    281
    I have heard of people using a screen which might be better. Concerning egg crate, I did find this onRC, maybe someone who has the mag can confirm.

    "There is a right and wrong way to use egg crate. If you have Freshwater and Marine Aquarium magazine (FAMA) from Oct 2000, check out the article by Dana Riddle. He talk about his use of egg crate.

    According to his article "Eggcrate (technically called a parabolic louver) is engineered to focus light downwards but it must be used correctly. If one examines a sheet closely he or she will see that there is a "thick" side and a "thin" side. The "thick" side must be facing upwards for light focusing to occur."

    Also according to the article, you can get up to 25% more light in a small area. When used upside down, you will get 10% less light."

    Also another good link

    http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/sh...ight=egg+crate

    Then main part is

    "from Anthony Calfo at
    http://forum.marinedepot.com/Topic24384-13-1.aspx


    "Many aquarists commonly use the (drop ceiling) building material known as "egg grate."

    This intersecting lighting grid is designed for drop ceiling installations in places where light fixtures are installed. Aquarists use egg grate to cover their aquariums as they block little light from above and nicely keep most all fishes from jumping out at the same time [Smile]

    But did you know that there is a top side and a down side to egg grate?

    More accurately, there is a spread side and a focus side. That is to say, the interior partitions of the grid are actually tapered to a narrow on one side for the purpose of spreading or focussing light downward, depending on position.

    One side measures approximately .07 in thickness while the other measures only .05

    So if you are installing egg grate in an office and you are looking for optimizing light spread and energy consumption/efficiency, you'd naturally want maximum spread of light (the tapered side facing downward).

    But we want to focus precious aquarium light (expensive to produce!) downward to get as much of it into out aquarium as possible (tapered side up). If you have an aquarium in a dark living room, for example, you may notice that light shines out from the aquarium glass and onto the floor. That is wasted light! But if you put the egg grate over it and focus the light downward, you will notice the light does not spill onto the floor anymore! Remember... tapered side up for aquaria.

    The other caveat is that you want to capture the light before it gets a chance to spread out from the fixture itself... so the egg grate must be rather near to the lamps. Fluorescents are easy... they must be close to the aquarium water surface to be remotely effective in the first place (within 3") and the egg grate can be placed safely between them. But metal halide/halogen lamps run very hot and the egg grate can melt, like other plastics. Keep the egg grate several inches away and use cooling fans for hot lamps. That's no inconvenience here because you will need to keep metal halide lamps farther off the surface than fluorescents anyways, and they all typically benefit (literally affecting the color and quality of light) from running cooler (with ans) regardless of egg grate use or not.

    FWIW"


    __________________
    Anthony"

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    150
    I purchased some egg crate material from Home Depot and something to watch for is, "look for a chip or any damage what so ever" and ask for a discount. They should take 10% off without hesitation, more if the damage is great enough. You end up cutting it to bits anyway.
    For my tank, I have an enclosed hood, so the fish are in on 3 sides anyway. For the back side, I have a piece about 3" wide, so it does not block much light and seems to keep the fish in. Although I have a wrasse that wants to escape from time to time. Once I heard a terrible racket and thought my little fan had fallen into the tank or got caught up on something, but the wrasse had jumped up, hit the egg crate and bounced off it into the overflow box. Got him out ok none worse for the wear.
    As for the tapered walls, I am a mould maker and you add draft on every plastic part where possible, makes it come out of the mould with less stress, but it would assist in some small way I suppose. Good marketing though.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Preventing jumpers
    By Krugar in forum Just Getting Started
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-23-2006, 07:33 AM
  2. Gobies - Jumpers?
    By Grimstalk in forum Reef Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-21-2004, 02:12 AM
  3. Will eggcrate stop jumpers?
    By Cake Fan in forum Reef Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 04-04-2004, 02:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •