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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    First casualty..

    My poor little cleaner shrimp...
    I found him, all 50 legs up in the air...
    What could have caused this?
    He was fine this morning, and all the other fishes look fine....
    I did another water test after I found him, and my nitrite was up a little bit, but I assume it was from the shrimp, I tested it Sunday night and had zero levels of nitrite.
    I have had my tank up and running for aboot 6 mos now, and this is my first casualty, I am gonna go do a water change...

    But what could hacve caused this?
    I have a pink tip anemone, a sea urchin and 2 clowns, plus the cleaner crew....

    Is there something I have overlooked???

    Here ae my levels...
    (as of sunday)
    temp 78
    PH 8.5
    salintiy 1.026
    ammonia 0
    nitrite .00
    nitrate .2
    phosphate .25
    calcium 425

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2003
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    How long did you have him and how big was he? Cleaner Shrimp have a pretty short life span as compared to fish.
    Rob

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    How long did you have him and how big was he? Cleaner Shrimp have a pretty short life span as compared to fish.
    Rob

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2003
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    Cool

    also, did you acclimate him for a good 3 hours before putting him in the tank? Inverts are very sensitive to salinity changes.
    Are you sure your not seeing just his molted shell? Had to ask because the very first shrimp I had I thought was dead one morning when I seen his complete body[empty shell] lying on the sand bed. He could be hiding now that he has to build a new shell[sorta]. Salty, is rightthat there life span is not to long but I've had cleaners last 2+ years.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    Jan 2004
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    He was definitely dead...I had him for only a month and a half... However, I spoke to the guys at Marinescapes, and they suggested that he could have gotten an infection when he last molted... (which was last Thursday)
    It was so sad... I went on a rampage last night, and tested all the params again, because I have heard horror stories about ammonia spikes, but all the levels are good...

    I did see him trying to clean the anemone (a pink tip) and is it possible that the he got poisoned from the anem?

    It was a sudden death, because yesterday morning he was doin great and then I found him in the afternoon....
    I am who I am who I am who am I


    DMB

  6. #6
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    2 and 1/2 years for a cleaner Johnny . Thats long for them ... how big was he.
    megs... I have been told that when shrimp molt if the new skin is not properly developed under the old one they will die. I have also heard that if the water dose no contain what they need to grow the new skin it will be too small fortheir new bigger body size and they will die. Kind of like making a snail live in the same shell all his life. Perhaps it is one of these issues that caused his passing.
    Rob

  7. #7
    Junior Member
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    Thanks Rob.
    I know phosphates can hurt them, but what else should I look at?
    I am who I am who I am who am I


    DMB

  8. #8
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    Heavy metals if theres any chance that they could get into your tank. Copper is one of the worst and kills them pretty fast too. Shrimp that are exposed to heavy metals will usually have Grey to black spots /blotches on the new skin. And of course he may have just dies because no matter how well you take care of your tank Megs .... sometimes things die. It is an unfortunate part of our hobby.
    Rob

  9. #9
    Senior Member GoSUV's Avatar
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    Although it is a controversial topic, I thought I'd bring this up. Shrimps need iodine to properly molt. Iodine also doesn't stay in the water for long, for it is very easy for it to be skimmed off by your skimmer. So you should be dosing iodine regularly if you keep shrimps.

    It may be just anecdote, but I also can relate a similar story. I used to have 1 blood shrimp and 1 cleaner. The cleaner was added first. About 6 months after I had him, he died not long after he molted. The blood shrimp was healthy otherwise, but was also starting to lose its striking red colour after each successive molt.

    I started dosing iodine regularly, and the blood shrimp's colour seems to have returned somewhat, and it continues to molt without problems.

    Also check your calcium levels. The hard shell of shrimps must contain some calcium. If Ca level is low, the shrimp may have trouble hardening its shell, which leaves it vulnerable.
    If the authors of "Finding Nemo" knew anything about Clownfishes, Marlin would turn into a female and Nemo would become her new husband.

  10. #10
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    I'm not sold on the iodine dosing. I've kept shrimps for 3 years and they always molted without problems and lasted a good 2 years +. Just my oppion ,some add,some don't.

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