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  1. #1
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    Mar 2004
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    Algea Growth on Gravel(Sand)

    I've noticed some really dark green spots on some of my gravel. I would of thought the snails would of cleaned it up but they haven't.

    I've also noticed some bubble algea on my rock. Should I just reduce the amount of lighting during the day? Will the algea be reduced?

    Cheers !!

  2. #2
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    Mar 2004
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    ohh yea, my tank also seems kinda green (water ) under the PC 96W 10K. Is this normal or am I suffering from too much lighting.

    I try to keep the lights on for only 8hrs a day..although sometimes it goes to 10 ( just bought new timers )
    45 Gallon
    x2 96WPC Lights, x2 9W over CPR fuge, x1 36W T5 Actinic
    Remora C skimmer, Ehiem Cannister
    Solon Wrasse,Yellow Tang, Clarkii Clown, Blue Neon Goby, Mandarin
    Assorted Zoo's,Shrooms,Rics, LPS

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2004
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    432
    You probably have a phosphate or nitrate problem. I would use a ro or Di unit to threat my tap water and I would do some water change... The light you are using could be not accurate or too old. You can be overfeeding your tank or you do not have enough water circulation. If you are telling to yourself that there is a lot of factor that can lead to an algae problem, then you are right !!!!!!

  4. #4
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    Mar 2004
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    I think it's a combination of overfeeding, too long of light duration and tap water.

    I've just made the switch to RO water. Hoefully that will help.

    Does that Phosphate absorption stuff work? I was thinking of adding some to my cannister filter.
    45 Gallon
    x2 96WPC Lights, x2 9W over CPR fuge, x1 36W T5 Actinic
    Remora C skimmer, Ehiem Cannister
    Solon Wrasse,Yellow Tang, Clarkii Clown, Blue Neon Goby, Mandarin
    Assorted Zoo's,Shrooms,Rics, LPS

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2004
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    432
    I have tryed this, and I have not seen effect on my grow of algae. I think the best product to control algae grow is Kalkwasser. It does make the phosphate to precipitate.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2004
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    730
    Algae need 2 things to grow - food and light. 10 hours of light is not excessive. I have always found it easier to control the food. Food for algae is nitrates and phosphates. Both of these can be controlled by - reducing the excess food or - putting other plants in that absorb the food faster (otherwise known as macro algae in the refuge).

    When I say to reduce the excess food, I mean to increase your clean up crew not to starve your fish. Hungry fish are fish under stress. Fish under stress, like people under stress, tend to have more problems (like ich). Each fish has different requirements that you must look at. Some fish eat the food while it falls to the bottom of the tank. Other fish like to pick at the food after it has fallen. You have to decide how much is too much but I often find that if I divide my food into 2 or 3 batches and feed (even with only an hour between feedings) more often that less food is left for the snails/crabs.

    The macro algae works but takes time. The faster growing macro algae, the more nutrients it is absorbing. Some macro algae release toxins in the water and others don't. Here is a good run down on various macro algaes - http://www.reefcentral.com/forums/sh...hreadid=349241

    The phosphate absorption stuff works but again takes time. You have to be careful which ones you use. Some release aluminium into the water which has been proven to irritate some corals. Here is a good artiicle on that - http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issu...y2003/chem.htm I have used Phosguard (one of the ones that release alumimium) off and on when my phosphates get high. I put it in the sump and monitor my phosphate levels. When the levels get to 0, I remove the Phosguard. At this point, I can usually see the algae lifting off the rocks/sand in sheets and then it is just a matter of removing as much of the algae as I can.

    As Zeke said, some people believe that kalk dripping will cause the phosphate to precipitate. Quoting from this article http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issu...t2002/chem.htm - "Many reef keepers accept the concept that limewater addition reduces phosphate levels. This may be true, but the mechanism remains to be demonstrated. Craig Bingman has done a variety of experiments related to this hypothesis, and published them in Aquarium Frontiers. While many may not care what the mechanism is, knowing it would help to understand the limits to this method, and how it might best be employed." I drip kalk water 24/7 to replace evaporated water to replenish the Ca and alk used by the corals. If it helps the phospates, great.

    Vickie

  7. #7
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    Nov 2003
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    36
    Originally posted by vjvl51
    As Zeke said, some people believe that kalk dripping will cause the phosphate to precipitate. ... <snip> ... If it helps the phospates, great.
    Good post Vickie. Looking at this last bit, I wonder that it does (help)? You're right, people say it all the time. I'm curious as to what people here think of this article though? Nonsense ... maybe something to it ... reefkeepers gospel?

    Sudden Algae Outbreaks

    I think the thing to be careful of is the notion that precipitating phosphate makes it magically leave the tank. It doesn't of course, it's still there, and it may even come back to bite you given the right conditions.

  8. #8
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    Jan 2004
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    730
    Jammer, Randy has mentioned (maybe the article above or another post - I didn't reread the entire article) that phosphates can/will be re-absorbed into the water column under certain conditions. If I remember correctly, this was one reason why phosphate removers (in some cases) don't seem to lower the phosphate levels when you do water tests. Of course this is all dependant upon how much phosphates have been precipatated out and the chemical conditions of the tank.

    As you said, this does not make it "magically leave the tank" and I seem to remember someone commenting on this precipatation action as a possible cause of the tank crashes blamed on the dsb. If I remember correctly, there are more chemicals that percipate into our dsb than just phosphates and it is this build up of chemicals/metals, etc that causes these crashes. Some people recommend changing part of the sand bed every so many years to remove this build up. Others say that the release of toxic gases/chemicals in the deep areas of the sand bed cause more harm than the build up of chemicals/metals so they only have 2 dsb in a separate area (ie refuge) so it is easy to remove and replace one while allowing the other to carry the load. Some have gone as far as recommending that we replace the lr on a regular basis for the same reason.

    As you can tell, I spent many hours reading all the opinions about the dsb but to answer your question - I have read enough to say that there is some merit in that article.

    IMO the best way to control phosphates (I say control since I feed phyto daily and that adds phosphates, daily, to my tank) is through export via two things - macro algae and xenia. While I haven't tried xenia, I am told that it is a great phosphate sink. I have just started looking into this.

    Vickie

  9. #9
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    Jan 2004
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    You may be true about Kalkwasser Viackie. I have found that information in Coral Propagation by Calfo. That is a wonderfull book, but I have never seen proof that it is right or not to think that lime water make phosphate to precipitate. I think this is the worst think in that hobby, we never have scientific proof that what we are doing is right For myself, I have seen a big reduction of hair algae in my tank, when I started to use Kalkwasser, but that is not a scientific proof...

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2004
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    You are right, Zeke. It is hard to know what is fact and what is someone's opinion. This is why I like to post sources which allows others to check and make their own decisions. Coral Propagations is a widely respected book.

    My only concern about all books is how up to date is the info. Sometimes it seems that we are learning new things all the time.

    Since kalkwasser is working for you, I wouldn't change anything.

    Vickie

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