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  1. #1
    Senior Member reefmac's Avatar
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    Sump/Fuge Advantages

    I'm trying to explain the the wife my plans for my 67g with regards to a sump and refugium. Her question, which being a newbie I couldn't fully answer, was why not just use the Fluval Cannister filter we have as opposed to the sump? What is the big advantage other than another place to setup heaters, skimmer, etc?

    Thanks for any input!

    Troy
    "I'm Mad!...I'm mad 'cause I cant see my forehead!" ~ Patrick Starfish, Bikini Bottom, Ocean

  2. #2
    Senior Member AndrewNS's Avatar
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    One big advantage is the extra water volume.

  3. #3
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    Natural filtration...you can put macro algae in the sump to help with nitrates. You can also raise lots of pods in the fuge portion to help feed the fish in the main tank....plus it is more fun to play with a fuge than clean a filter!!
    35Gal mixed Reef with light fish load. 250W MH, Jebo Skimmer,

    100Gal FOWLR- Heavy fish load and a few soft corals.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Conan's Avatar
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    1) when you open a canister, you upset the chemical balance in the ecosystem. The sump can be cleaned easily.
    2) In-sump protein skimmers are better that HOT ones (Hang on Back)
    3) canister filters produce huge amounts of nitrates.
    Do or do not. There is no "try" - Jedi Master Yoda

  5. #5
    Senior Member reefmutt's Avatar
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    The refugium, as it's name suggests is a quiete and prtected place where all sorts of small creatures and plants can live and reproduce without getting eaten by the fish in he main tank. All of these animals that are allowed to reproduce put their spawn into the water which gets back into the main tank to replenish what has been eaten by the fish. Some of this 'plankton' is also consumed by corals as it floats by their tentacles. Also, If you light up this 'fuge' you can help partially offset the ph drop that happens in a tank at night when the lightsgo off. By putting the fuge on a reverse daylight schedule and allowing the plants to produce oxygen while the main tank is consuming it, you contribute dramatically to stability of the system
    Another benefit is nutrient removal, as the plants grow they remove nutrients from the water and compete with hair algea in the main tank- keeping the system cleaner. As you rip out the plants in the fuge as they grow, you are removing waste from the system.
    Now, Conan, I have to disegree with you about the cannister filter. Opening up a cannister filter, Imo has no effect on the system at all. It is such a small bit of the system and it's only function is to trap particles- removing it and cleaning it simply removes the crap itwas trapped from the system. Also, cannisters don't really produce nitrates as a wet dry does. They may contribute to an accumulation of nitrate in the system if they ar not cleaned regularly but they don't produce nitrate.
    There is nothing wrong with putting a cannister filter on as well, they are not mutually exclusive. It isn't really necessary to use a cannister, but you certainly couldif you plan to keep it clean- the draw back to a cannister is that itwill remove some of the beneficial 'plankton floating around in the system.
    Matt.

    Old system torn down to make a playroom.. planning a 62x42x28 high

  6. #6
    Senior Member Conan's Avatar
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    Well, the way I see it is that when you clean a cannister, you take away some of the nitrifying bacteria and break a piece of the cycle. When I did testing after a cleanup of my canister, you would have a small cycle that would happen afterwards. This was confirmed with the ammonia and nitrite tests I performed.
    It is also widely documented that cannister filters are nitrate producing factories. That's the reason I got mine off my system.
    Of course, these are only my experiences with the cannister and I respect what you say reefmutt, it's just that in the end, it wasn't working on my system, and these are the reasons why. But I could understand why/how someone would have different results with using a cannister.
    Do or do not. There is no "try" - Jedi Master Yoda

  7. #7
    Senior Member percula99's Avatar
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    All of what has been said above.

    Also a sump is a good place to put additives. This way they mix with the water in the sump, rather than in the main tank.

    Water will also evaporate in the sump rather than the main tank, so the water line doesn't show.

    Check out this link for more information.

    http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-01/gt/index.htm

    Conan/Reefmutt - I don't run a canister filter on my reef because I do not think it is required. I do however run one occasionally if I find my water is looking a little yellow. Carbon gets rid of that yellowing look. I will also run one if I plan on buying a new fish. This way I have a filter ready to go on my quarantine tank.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Conan's Avatar
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    Increased total water volume - This dilutes your water of accumulating pollutants, and helps avoid issues that occur quickly in sumpless tanks.
    Skims the surface - No more surface scum, just crystal clear water.
    Lowers temperature - I've observed a 2 F drop after the sump is installed.
    Hides equipment - Heaters, protein skimmers, monitoring probes, grounding probes and more can be moved to the sump & out of the display tank.
    Consistent water level - The display tank will maintain the same water level all the times; evaporation occurs in the sump over time (see auto top-off).
    Safe place to pour in additives - Adding chemicals or new (Reverse Osmosis De-Ionized) water in the sump allows it to mix before entering the display tank.
    Increased circulation - The return water from the sump is yet another way to move water in your tank. You can point the return outlet(s) in different directions to create flow, instead of putting more powerheads in your display tank!
    Increased oxygenation - As water drains into your sump, air mixes in the water, allowing beneficial gas exchange, releasing CO2 and adding fresh O2.
    Do or do not. There is no "try" - Jedi Master Yoda

  9. #9
    Senior Member Flame*Angel's Avatar
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    Is she convinced yet?
    Susan

  10. #10
    Senior Member reefmac's Avatar
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    LOL Flame Angel,
    I don't know if she's convinced or not but I definitely am...and that's what really matters now isn't it

    Troy
    "I'm Mad!...I'm mad 'cause I cant see my forehead!" ~ Patrick Starfish, Bikini Bottom, Ocean

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