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Thread: WC percentage?

  1. #1
    Senior Member DARK's Avatar
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    WC percentage?

    I'll be doing my WC tomorrow. I've always done a 25-30 gallon(on a 72g tank) change over and think that it might be too much. What would be a good volume to change? 10%, 20% 30%. Ive tested the water and only see less then 5ppm nitrAtes after 42 days since last wc. Is there a standard limit or just change as much as you feel you need?

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Moderator cres's Avatar
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    At the very least you should do 10% over a 2 month period.

    Depending on bio-load you may want more.

    10% per month is probably okay if you are at 5 PPM Nitrate. Under 10 PPM is considered okay, but, some will say 0 is the only good number.

    I'd reserve the 20+% changes for times of need.

    In the end you have to decide on a schedule and amount that you can manage while your levels are maintained. You don't want to go from 10 PPM do 90% water change to get it to one, then go back to 10, too much change and chance to shock.

    If you shift to 10% per month and find your nitrates continue to rise, you might need to change more, or more often. Conversely, if your nitrates slowly drop, you have enough being changed.

    Remember, almost everything you read about a marine reef is anecdotal or a guideline. Your mileage may vary.
    Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

  3. #3
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    I've always been more comfortable in the 10 to 15% max range.

  4. #4
    Senior Member DARK's Avatar
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    So is it only based on levels, nitrate and such that WC's are needed? If levels are low, within acceptable ranges, does doing a waterchange make sense?

  5. #5
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    I suggest fitting smaller WC's more frequently, unless you have a real nitrate problem, i used to do the same just wait for a month then do huge wc's but i find my corals healthier with smaller more frequent 10% WC's
    Mark
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  6. #6
    Senior Member tang_man_montreal's Avatar
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    I do about 20-25gallons every 2-3weeks on my 180gal.
    I am Homer of BORG... Prepare to be..OOOO!! DONUT!!!!!!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Deafboy's Avatar
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    Originally posted by tang_man_montreal
    I do about 20-25gallons every 2-3weeks on my 180gal.
    Must cost you a bundle in salt!!

    -40 dB
    20 g reef, 72 g reef

  8. #8
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    Cool

    it all depends on biolaod I guess but I always thought that to much water changes wasn't good either. I change every 3 months or so.

  9. #9
    Senior Member tang_man_montreal's Avatar
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    Deafboy...
    It's not so bad...I try to time my salt purchasing with specials at BigAls' and stock up.. LOL
    A 160gal bucket lasts me quite a long time actually. Approximately 8 Waterchanges. Spaced over 2-3 weeks between... several months.

    I have a high bioload in my tank, I also believe in waterchanges to replace lost trace elements.
    I am Homer of BORG... Prepare to be..OOOO!! DONUT!!!!!!

  10. #10
    Moderator cres's Avatar
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    Dark:

    Ideally, you are doing water changes before you can detect any levels of anything.

    The problem is that we don't have test kits for >everything< that matters in a reef tank. We don't even know what some of them are. As time goes on, more things are understood.

    You can get away with water changes and no skimmer, calcium addition, etc., or you can reduce the water changes by using kalk/calcium, skimmer, additives, etc.

    You want to minimize water chages, to a certain extent. 10% a day gets very expensive and would be unnecessary (but, effective), while 5% a year would likely lead to a disaster even with a skimmer and calcium reactor.
    Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

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