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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Coworker madness

    Hey!

    I'm new to the forum.

    A coworker (Dazz) is trying to bring me down into his reef madness. I have resisted so far, but his propaganda slowly finds its way into my mind.

    I'm new to saltwater, but I successfully owned a freshwater tropical fish tank a few years ago. I had experienced very few deaths... none by my fault (One got trapped into the filter, and a few others were simply too yummy for my Oscar).

    My concerns for now are really simple ones. I move a lot, I plan to move again next year to find a bigger appartment or to buy something. It seems really complicated with a big fish tank (I dont want something smaller than 50g-60g) and all its inhabitants. The other thing is that I live on the second floor of my building. I really fear water leak accidents. I can only imagine how a 60g water tank would damage the building and my insurance wouldn't pay. Is there a way to really secure the thing and minimize the risks to "Impossible to happen"?

    Thanks!

    Freaky

  2. #2
    Senior Member tang_man_montreal's Avatar
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    First of all....

    [welcome2]

    Secondly, you poor soul, you know Dazz too?? And actually WORK with him??? (just kidding Dazz)

    Moving around might be an issue. As things with saltwater tanks normally tend to take about a year to really take off.. I'm speaking of water stability, coral growth, fish relationships, etc... However if you're dedicated, and if the move is properly done, minimal stress can be accounted for.

    Water leaks... the all so feared "flood"....
    Many things can be done to avoid floods.
    - Use a tank with a built-in overflow towards the sump. Hang-on overflows are notoriously problematic.
    - Use a large sump that can handle extra water during a power outage. When power goes out, water will siphon down into the sump. You want to be able to account for that extra inrush of water.
    - Keep anti-siphon holes clean, and checkvalves clean.
    - If using an auto top-off, keep fault-tolerance in mind. ie: use a backup floatvalve or switch, Keep top-off water down to a minimum, etc.
    - Don't fine-tune your skimmer before going to bed.

    In all due honesty, floods can happen, and often happen when you're not there. Taking some of those above pointers, and others that will be mentioned, will help however.

    I am Homer of BORG... Prepare to be..OOOO!! DONUT!!!!!!

  3. #3
    Moderator Krugar's Avatar
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    Originally posted by tang_man_montreal
    - Don't fine-tune your skimmer before going to bed.
    Guilty lol...
    There is nothing so permanent as a temporary measure.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Deafboy's Avatar
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    I used to live an apartment on third floor with a 72 g reef. It was a huge hassle. Even if you get the plumbing right so there are no water spillage from overflows and sumps, you still have to do water changes. This aspect is difficult to do in an apartment. You NEED purified water (RO or DI). It's not a big investment to own a RO/DI filter when you consider the cost of a reef, but how are you going to do this in an apartment? In addition, supposing you do have a RO filter, carrying large buckets of purified water across the apartment living room is a hassle. There will be some water dropping on the floor.

    Look at other reefers setups such as TangMan's (nice setup by the way...). Water changes and top-offs are simple procedures, such turning a valve or all automated. These makes caring for a large reef bearable. Very difficult to implement in an apartment.

    Also, if you move on a regular basis, your reef will find a hard time to become stable. It takes 4 to 6 months for a reef to start to look decent (no algea, cyanobacteria, diatoms).

    Also, does your apartment have air conditioning? If not then I would forget it. Temperature stability is very important in a reef. Many reef creatures will NOT survive a heat wave.

    If your apartment has air conditioning, then I would suggest a 20g (30 g at the most) with hang on back skimmer such as the remora, an auto top-off system and no sump. Water volumes are much lower so you can get away by purchasing RO water at the store instead of getting the RO filter. You can even do Kalk with the auto top-off. I also suggest compact fluorescent lighting. You'll have a beautiful, easy to maintain reef if you are patient and persistant.

    Michel
    20 g reef, 72 g reef

  5. #5
    Moderator Krugar's Avatar
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    All of the objections / challenges can be over come.

    The bottom line is: Do you want a marine tank now or do you want to wait?

    Once you've decided everything else can be worked out.

    Cheers!
    There is nothing so permanent as a temporary measure.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
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    Thanks for all the information and the warm welcome.

    I think I'll do as Deafboy suggested and wait to move to a permanent condo/ loft / house.

    Meanwhile, I'll do some reseach and try to learn as much as possible. So, I'll stick around this forum for sure

    thanks, Cya!

    JF

  7. #7
    Moderator cres's Avatar
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    Alternately ...

    It wouldn't hurt to get your fingers wet with a 20 gallon tank. Stick with normal output fluorescents and use water changes instead of a skimmer.

    Buy some good quality rock. Since you are in Montreal you will have no trouble finding a good supply.

    See if you have the interest and patience for the hobby without investing too much.
    Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Dazz's Avatar
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    Originally posted by tang_man_montreal
    - Don't fine-tune your skimmer before going to bed.

    Guilty also
    -Dazz

  9. #9
    Senior Member pwall's Avatar
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    And let's not foget:
    Don't turn on your RO/DI unit and forget about it and go to bed.
    Regards,
    Patrick.
    Ottawa (Orleans), Ontario
    Yahoo IM: pwallnfld

  10. #10
    Senior Member Dazz's Avatar
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    I think you should still get a small tank, 20 gallon etc. You can easily have a tank like that with easy to keep corals like Xenia, zoos, leathers, a damsel or 2, a cleaner shrimp and some snails/hermits. It would at least introduce you to the hobby and you would find out if you _really_ want to go bigger when you do get a more perminent location. You could even get a Hang on back skimmer/ refugium combo so you would never have the issue of a flood (well unless your tank broke ). That is actually what I had for the first 8 months of my 50 gallon tank and it worked just fine.
    -Dazz

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