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  1. #1
    Senior Member cdn beaver's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
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    Unhappy Crap....Nightmare

    After almost a year and a half, with things starting to look great and everything finally comming together, I found the worst possible thing....

    My tank is leaking :bawling:

    It is leaking at the bottom where the back pane and bottom pane of glass meet and is covered by the plastic strip.

    I will start to source another replacement tank tommoro, but I have no idea how to go about moving everything over to a new tank. Wont disturbing the sand bed cause major problems? What do I do with my livestock? Will the tank have to cycle again?

    Does anyone make a standard size tank that will fit in an area of 30" long, 17" high, and 20" deep? I am currently using a 25 gallon, but seems like as good a time as any to upgrade. Do to the way my stand is built, I pretty much stuck with these demensions. I may be able to gain afew inches here an there...

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

    :sadwalk:

    I feel ill...
    Cheers,
    Mark

    Setup:
    27 Gallon Saltwater tank, 110W PC Light, Seaclone 100, 5 gallon HOB Fuge,Approx. 30lbs Live rock, Aragamax sand substrate.
    Livestock:
    Tomato clown, Mandarin dragonnet, Bicolor Angel, Assorted hermits and snails, Cleaner Shrimp.
    Corals:
    Assorted mushrooms, Zoanthids, Finger Leather.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Bummer ... There's no doubt that changing everything into another tank will upset things. A short cycle should be expected. Put your stock elsewhere as needed. You can minimize the upset to the sand be by trying to move it without completely mixing it up. Perhaps you can scoop the sand bed out with a new dust pan so the bulk of it will remain somewhat unchanged. Best of luck when you do this job.
    Rob

  3. #3
    Senior Member rockgarden's Avatar
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    May 2005
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    159
    Sorry John. Couldn't resist. Extracted the following from a Florida Angler article and modified slightly.

    Enjoy

    Ron
    _____

    Homegrown Grouper
    The introduction of artificial reefs near the Ottawa-Orleans border opens up a fantastic nearshore grouper fishery.This sure didnt feel like grouper water to me. We were only six kilo,etres from Parliament Hill in 40 inches of water. The shoreline was clearly in view, and we were rigging up heavy bottom fishing gear with a variety of grouper baits. It was the kind of game plan Northeast Ontario fishermen traditionally execute some 15 or 20 miles offshore. This close to shore wed expect to tangle with kingfish, cobia, tarpon and other coastal fish.

    But large grouper?

    I landed a nice tang here last week, Stan Mankovich commented as he dropped his baits to the bottom. Mankovich added that he had recently horsed a 20-pound gag grouper off this DIY pile of concrete that comprises part of the JohnnyRock artificial reef complex. We were impressed, if a little skeptical.

    The second Stans grouper baits hit bottom, the seasoned reefer detected a solid strike. With his rodtip aimed straight down, Stan power-lifted his rod and began to force a large fish up off the bottom. Everyone on AquariaCanada began shouting words of encouragement.

    Reel Stan, reel, reel! Dont let that grouper get the best of you! Reel, reel!

    :happy2:

  4. #4
    Senior Member rockgarden's Avatar
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    OOPS. Wrong thread.

    Ron

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    put your liverock in a garbage can with a heater and power head.
    put your live stock in there as well. remove old tank, put new tank in. put old sand in and let settle, run some kind of powerhead with a foam filter to help clear up the mess. let cycle [won't be much] and test. start adding your liverock back in. [a little at a time]. once everything test A okay put back livestock.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bram's Avatar
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    if you keep the water you could avoid a cycle.
    but if you get a new tank and a bigger one, i know your stuck with those dimensions (i'm thinking length and width) but did you think about getting a tall tank?
    maybe the same dimensions length and width (which will keep your lighting fixture the same and save money for an upgrade there)
    a tall tank looks great, totally different feel i really like them
    its all up to you
    hope it was a good idea
    Who says Dogs are the only creature that's happy to see you?

    Pics --> http://aquariacanada.com/PhotoPost/s...r=1248&cat=500

  7. #7
    Senior Member StephG's Avatar
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    Since your tank is not too big I'd suggest using a new sandbed and seeding with the old sand. A 40 lbs bad of argonite isn't too expensive. That way you'll avoid any nasty problems related to sandbed stirring. If you use the same tank water also you most like won't have a cycle or a very very small one. Once everything is moved to the new tank you can seed the sandbed with some of your old sand. The only reason I recommend doing things this way is that I had a very bad experience trying to move an established sand bed.

    Good luck,

    Steph

  8. #8
    Senior Member cdn beaver's Avatar
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    Thank you for the replies.

    Im pretty sure Im going to go with a new sand bed. I was pretty sure stirring up the old one would create gasses and other problems. Since I get to start fresh with a new sand bed, what would you recommend? I was using about a 1-2" Aragamax sand, and was thinking of using the same, but mixxing with some slightly coarser crushed coral to give different textures. Im also thinking about possibly using black sand.

    I've called around locally for tanks, and have only found 1 place that stocks tanks. I am definitely thinking about a taller tank. I can get a 27 gallon tank locall that is the same dimesions in width and length, but is afew inches taller. This will require some slight modifications to my stand, but should be pretty easy.

    Lastly, by using the same water, plus alittle bit of new water, can my livestock be put into the tank right away, or should I tryto find someone to take them?

    Thanks again.
    Cheers,
    Mark

    Setup:
    27 Gallon Saltwater tank, 110W PC Light, Seaclone 100, 5 gallon HOB Fuge,Approx. 30lbs Live rock, Aragamax sand substrate.
    Livestock:
    Tomato clown, Mandarin dragonnet, Bicolor Angel, Assorted hermits and snails, Cleaner Shrimp.
    Corals:
    Assorted mushrooms, Zoanthids, Finger Leather.

  9. #9
    Moderator cres's Avatar
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    Jul 2004
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    I would say you can add the livestock "right away", meaning over a few days after the new tank is set up. I'd just keep them in whatever bin(s) you have setup while the new tank settles. Add a few hardier critters, watch them for a day. Then add more. etc. Keep an eye on your levels and prepare for some extra water changes over the next few weeks.
    Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

  10. #10
    Senior Member StephG's Avatar
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    I personally don't like the look of crushed coral. A friend of mine setup his sandbed with a mixture of argonite and crushed coral and I didn't like it. The crushed coral became covered in algae and to me didn't look good at all. He has since moved to an argonite sandbed but you may have better luck with crushed coral than him I personnaly like the look of fine argonite. Not the sugar sized. The fine argonite doesn't blow around like the sugar sized stuff will. As for your critters I think Cres had a very good suggestion in adding the hardiest critters first and watch it for 1-2 days monitoring params just to make sure. In my opinion you will not be able to detect any amonia/nitrite if nothing is left exposed to air for too long. When I did my switch over to my new tank and new sandbed everything survived even if I just put them right into the new tank. I only had my cleanup crew though ... no corals or fish. Corals are definatly more sensitive than hermits and snails so it's good advice to keep them isolated to make sure everything is fine with the new setup.

    Good luck

    Steph

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