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  1. #1
    Senior Member tictoc's Avatar
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    metal in aquariums

    This is kinda off topic, so I put it here anyways... ok as we all know metal is a no no in our aquariums...pretty much wipe most things out, but..no BUT, why is it that when a ship sinks, or some reef club sinks a ship it's covered by all types of marine life fairly quickly...now I know some of you are thinking the sea is so vast that the amount that's leaching is not detectable..and maybe that's correct but this stuff lives right on it!!! so it has to be detectable at that level =)!! and these ships are disolving/corroding in the sea because they are slowly disappearing!!

    Tic
    Any darn fool can make something complex; it takes a genius to make something simple

  2. #2
    Senior Member ktown's Avatar
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    I would think that it has to do with the size of the ocean. Our tanks are so tiny to compare. Although the same can be said about most toxins. our tanks water is much cleaner compared to the natural ocean. Maybe thats it... Our tanks are too clean and pure!
    TANK -35 Gallon with 15 gallon sump/fuge
    LIGHTS - T5HO 36" 165 total watts
    FLOW - Mag 7, fluval 304, 201 powerhead
    OTHER - seaclone 100 skimmer, RO/DI water

  3. #3
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    IMO proximity is still not an issue because the constantly oxidizing metals on ships parts is being swept away by very vast amounts of new water... not to mention that the metal oxidizes very very slowly.
    Rob

  4. #4
    Senior Member mickyfin's Avatar
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    Not all metals are bad for everything. There are tons of metals in the ocean that naturally occur. Copper is toxic to some aquatic invertibratres, but only at relatively high concentration.

    That being said I'll wager theres very little copper in the "reef ships". Even if there is, the volume of water passing over it (makes your 100 G tank look like a drop) would quickly diffuse anything to minimal concentration.

    Don't Panic Feel free to visit my blog -> Internet Tough Guy.

  5. #5
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    I'm guessing that he's talking about the creatures living right on the metal parts itself. good question, who knows. probally because first algeas will adhere to the bare metal like corraline and then slowly things adhere to the corraline which is hard as rock and basically sealing the metal in.

  6. #6
    Senior Member tictoc's Avatar
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    yes Johnny, that's what I meant...the ones that live right on the metal parts...ok lead paint for instance..lets say it's on your walls...now when you measure the air for lead it'll measure virtually nothing...but if your leaning aganist it you will absorb some through your skin. so you would figure the same thing will happen with critters living on a sunken ship...maybe johnny is right in that the wreck gets all covered and that protects em

    Tic
    Any darn fool can make something complex; it takes a genius to make something simple

  7. #7
    Senior Member mickyfin's Avatar
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    You guys are assuming again that metal is deadly to sea-life. Far from the truth.

    Lots of things grow on metal just fine because it represents no threat to them.
    Don't Panic Feel free to visit my blog -> Internet Tough Guy.

  8. #8
    liv
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    Former Moderator liv's Avatar
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    also the fact that the same water usually never comes back to the same spot ever.. its like a constant water change.. no way life would be affected by it.. also add that the oxygen levels are much lower which slows/stops oxydation, hense why ships wrecks are usually kept in great condition in water...

    moving.. so temporarily out of SW :b8:
    planning next tank, possibly 60x30x20 on 2x plasma.
    updated: 2011/05/30

  9. #9
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    There are even artificial reefs made out of a metal grid with an electromagnetic current flowing through it. This helps speed up growth and coralline in forming. Probably the same reason why coralline often grows first on powerheads...

    Also..., and most important is that you can "never" compare our closed system tanks to the open oceans. The chemistry happening is like black & white!!

  10. #10
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    Even in our tanks metal touching things isn't the problem. It's that the metal builds up in the water - and the stuff has to eat and breath it. Lead pipes in a home aren't any problem until you drink the water.

    In the ocean the stuff doesn't get all concentrated.
    "Killed your clownfish? That's 30 days in the electric chair for you!"

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