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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    black dots on clowns

    Hi!
    I searched the forums and haven't found anything that works.
    I have had clown #1 for over 2years... never any dots.

    I introduced clown #2 recently. I think he may have had the dots when i purchased him!

    Now they have contaminated my other clown.
    I tought it was black Ich.
    Or Clown Diseas.
    I tried fresh water dips.
    Apperently the spots disapear quickly.
    I've done it over 1 week now without any luck.
    Any Ideas?
    Here are picks


  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    black dots

    Do you have an anemone they are trying to host?

  3. #3
    Senior Member xenon's Avatar
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    Black Ich
    Black Ich disease appears as small black spots distributed over the fish's body. The spots are about half the size of a pinhead or smaller. They are primarily found on the body and are are especially easy to see on light-colored body areas or on the transparent areas of the fins. Affected fish will scratch on the bottom or other aquarium objects. Other signs of the disease include lethargy, development of a pale body color, and lack of appetite. The disease is caused by a small worm known as a tubellarian. After parasitizing a fish, the worms develop on the fish's skin and gills and acquire dark pigmentation. They are freely mobile and will tend to move over the surface of the fish. After five or six days depending on the environmental conditions, they drop to the bottom of the aquarium. There they mature, with the development of the young worms within their body. Once the development of the young is complete, the adult worms burst, releasing the free swimming young that infest new host fish. The worms can be controlled with various commercially available medications. Formalin based products or those containing organophosphate compounds such as trichlorfon appear to be the best medications. In addition to the use of medications, any excessive buildup or organic material and debris should be siphoned from the aquarium several times during treatment. Since the young worms develop on the aquarium bottom, the removal of debris will aid in controlling the disease by reducing their numbers.
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  4. #4
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    So what type of medication should i use?

    On another note?
    Has anybody ever lost a CLAM?
    I bought one last night.
    Got home tonight, to find the shell empty and my large hermit sitting in it!
    GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

    OUT

    Quote Originally Posted by xenon
    Black Ich
    Black Ich disease appears as small black spots distributed over the fish's body. The spots are about half the size of a pinhead or smaller. They are primarily found on the body and are are especially easy to see on light-colored body areas or on the transparent areas of the fins. Affected fish will scratch on the bottom or other aquarium objects. Other signs of the disease include lethargy, development of a pale body color, and lack of appetite. The disease is caused by a small worm known as a tubellarian. After parasitizing a fish, the worms develop on the fish's skin and gills and acquire dark pigmentation. They are freely mobile and will tend to move over the surface of the fish. After five or six days depending on the environmental conditions, they drop to the bottom of the aquarium. There they mature, with the development of the young worms within their body. Once the development of the young is complete, the adult worms burst, releasing the free swimming young that infest new host fish. The worms can be controlled with various commercially available medications. Formalin based products or those containing organophosphate compounds such as trichlorfon appear to be the best medications. In addition to the use of medications, any excessive buildup or organic material and debris should be siphoned from the aquarium several times during treatment. Since the young worms develop on the aquarium bottom, the removal of debris will aid in controlling the disease by reducing their numbers.

  5. #5
    liv
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    Former Moderator liv's Avatar
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    if you have a hospital setup, get "cupramine" from Ivan.
    you can't put cupramine in your main tank.. cauz it will probebly kill snails and pretty much all crustacians and all little life in the tank.. like mysis.. worms..etc. so hospital needed. The bottle contains a solution of copper sulfate as the main ingredient.
    this stuff really works. use the dossage instructions on the container. This stuff is potent!

  6. #6
    Senior Member kjasjg's Avatar
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    I had a clown with some black dots but my cleaners took care of it. Not sure how easy it is to get clowns to accept cleaning though.

    you have cleaner shrimp?

    Ditch the hermit (I assume it is not a blue leg) as it will look for the easy meal.it will likely try for anything that it can eat (snails included) If it is a blue leg then it is a rogue and it should be segregated.

    Jer
    Its the early bird that gets the worm, but its the second mouse that gets the cheese.

  7. #7
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    That doesn't look like black ich, the spots look like under the skin and are fairly large. Are the spots on or under the skin? Is the color the same form one end to the other....the ones before the tail seem darker.
    "The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them."
    - Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

  8. #8
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    I know this my be silly.
    But how do i determine wether or not it's on or under?


    Quote Originally Posted by mike9515756
    That doesn't look like black ich, the spots look like under the skin and are fairly large. Are the spots on or under the skin? Is the color the same form one end to the other....the ones before the tail seem darker.

  9. #9
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    Have you ever seen ich (white spots)? If not just wait 1 or 2 days and determine if the spots are at the same place and if there are less or more. If not then it's probably black ich. The spots seem quite large for it to be ich though. There is no real remedy for ich, but my yellow tang once had black and white ich along as my other tangs (white ich) and the best thing is just to leave your fish in the tank and add pediavit (baby vitamin in drops) to the fish food (5-6 drops). It may take 1-3 months for it to dissipate. The way i see it, if the fish eats and acts normally then everything will be ok and dont worry about him. Some people just go crazy with qt tanks, formalin baths etc...

    Quote Originally Posted by twisty
    I know this my be silly.
    But how do i determine wether or not it's on or under?
    "The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them."
    - Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

  10. #10
    Junior Member
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by liv
    if you have a hospital setup, get "cupramine" from Ivan.
    you can't put cupramine in your main tank.. cauz it will probebly kill snails and pretty much all crustacians and all little life in the tank.. like mysis.. worms..etc. so hospital needed. The bottle contains a solution of copper sulfate as the main ingredient.
    this stuff really works. use the dossage instructions on the container. This stuff is potent!
    Liv, please don't mind that I go into a bit of details of copper medication classifications. Cupramine as you stated is actually one of the best copper medication available on the market today, it is considered complex copper and has the advantage of not get overdosed easily & stay in solution for a longer duration, however it is actually not copper sulfate based.

    There are three class of copper based medication commonly used.
    (1) Simple copper - most of these are simple compound such as the copper sulfate you stated. They were one of the first copper based medications available, however they can be (i) short lived, (ii) easily overdosed (iii) easily absorbed into calciuous medias
    (2) Chelated copper - these are copper combined with a chelated agent, they are considered much safer than simple copper and not as easy to overdose.
    (3) Complex copper - only product I know is cupramine, this is copper combined with a protein (amine molecule). It is considered best in its class in terms of safety and also removal (if you use copper absorbing agents).

    Like Liv said, all copper treatment should be performed in QT/Hospital tank without any calcious based material (i.e. no LR/LS).


    twisty, another thing I would add is that sometimes when clowns are sting by corals, they will have those black dots (zoos in particular). Have you noticed that with the addition of the 2nd clown, there is a change to the 1st clown's hosting location?

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