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Thread: Tubastrea

  1. #1
    Senior Member tiffany's Avatar
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    Tubastrea

    I really want a Tubastrea, the sun coral, and have made a cave for one etc, in preparation........ They are my favourite coral, and in abundant supply at the moment.
    None of the ones I've seen look good and the polyps are closed and often crushed on some tips, with bits dripping and most are not attached to LR.
    The fact that they are kept under lighting with assorted corals wont help their cause.
    My questions...
    How hard are they to bring back to good health and what do they eat? I know they don't eat phyto, and need to be fed daily, and are hard to keep.
    What should I look for in a good one??
    I've done some reading, and was wanting real world advise, so I don't make a mistake with them.
    "The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them."
    - Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

  2. #2
    Senior Member reefmutt's Avatar
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    They need to be fed very day, that's for sure. If you can get them to open up to feed you are laughing. They'll eat any meaty food like full grown brime shrimp or squid or krill etc. The particle size should be large enough to fit into their mouths- 1 or 2 millimeters- like grown brine shrimp or a little larger.
    Usually after adding some food to the tank, they will sense the aroma and begin to open up, once open, you should use a turkey baster to target feed them.
    They will recover and grow quickly if fed everyday. The trick is to get them to feed in the first place. Try it at the store, add food to the tank and watch if any begin to open up, if they do, it is a good chance that they will do well at home
    Matt.

    Old system torn down to make a playroom.. planning a 62x42x28 high

  3. #3
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    Tubastrea are one of the most vibrant color corals you can own. That said they can be tough to maintain if not cared for properly. The cave you have constructed is a great idea, but make sure you can feed the coral easily. You need to feed each head, as they are independant of each other. When buying one make sure it is orange all over and there is no sign of recession. You can't judge by polyp extension as they are always closed when in a store. They do great if you take good care of them.
    Good luck

  4. #4
    Senior Member Flame*Angel's Avatar
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    These are one of my favorite corals. I have four of them epoxied onto a rock on one end of my tank. They really don't need a cave, the light doesn't hurt them. You're better of putting them where you can reach them easily. If you can buy a really healthy one that's great but even ones with recession can be brought back if you're patient.

    The key to these corals is routine. If you feed them at the same time every day they will get used to your schedule in time. Healthy ones will figure it out sooner. I feed mine frozen brine shrimp just because they do well on it and it's easy to feed.

    I made a little talking tubastrea animation on my web site, if you want to check it out just click the link at the bottom of the front page that says "I have something to say".
    Susan

  5. #5
    Senior Member Zookeeper's Avatar
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    Tiffany:

    Check out this thread were this very issue was previously discussed:

    http://aquariacanada.com/forums/show...=&threadid=625

    A few things, that I think are important to mention:

    1) Keep this coral on the sand, out in the open, so that you can easily feed it with a turkey baster and the top of a soft drink bottle. They are basically "eaters", and don't really seem to care either way about how much light they get. I blend up a thick slurry of shrimp, brine shrimp, scallops, clams, oysters, white fish etc., but I have seen a single polyp consume a fingernail sized piece of food.

    2) The feeding is easy, and I have not found that individual polyps each need to be fed. Use the soft drink bottle top trick, and inject the food.

    3) Temper your feeding. They will eat everyday, but I have found that 2-3 times a week is plenty....especially since there is a lot of food waste from the process, which can cause other problems in your tank.

    4) I don't find them to be a fast growing coral, and they are an LPS, so they do make their own rock skeleton (ie: the polyps do not "attach" to live rock)

    5) These corals love Cyclop-Eeze. It takes about 10 minutes from the time I put it in my tank, for the polyps to open.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Flame*Angel's Avatar
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    I don't mean to be rude but I've had trouble with mine on the sand. Out in the open definitely and near the bottom is easier as there's less circulation so their food doesn't get blown away but on a rock on the sand is better.

    They are also very sensitive to stings so don't have one near an anemone or euphelia type coral.

    I've also noticed that the skeletons grow extremely slow. However, polyps can fill in dead spots very quickly if they are well fed.
    Susan

  7. #7
    Senior Member AJ_77's Avatar
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    That is some great info for someone sitting on the fence with this coral - I've also been curious about them for some time. Plainly, they are hungry little buggers ( as seen in the animation ). Funny stuff, Susan!

    - Alan

  8. #8
    Senior Member tiffany's Avatar
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    I couldn't get the animation, I have flash etc..
    Thanks for the info, I love the non-photosynthetic corals, the colors are so much more vivid.
    I've noticed some contradictions on placement, If I'm correct here, if M/H then in the shade,in NO then out in open is ok, preferably on a rock on the sand. I thought they were found in caves in a vertical position, in the dark, isn't it best to replicate this?? I'll read the books again and confirm this, as I was wondering how I'd imitate that.....
    I was planning on feeding with a big syringe attached to a tube and then squirt, though it seems that they like bigger food and the turkey blaster will be in force again.

    There's another I was reading about but I'm not sure if it's legal or available. It's the 'scleronephthya' similar to the Tubastrea but pink.
    Any info on these?
    I was planning on the 2 above and a gorgonian, with an anemone far away from them for the intended clowns, (but the anemone is last on the list as the corals are first priority)
    Also do these corals use less calcium than SPS?
    "The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them."
    - Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

  9. #9
    Senior Member tiffany's Avatar
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    Just found out they are legal and readily available. but more red than pink.
    Looks like lots of colors coming my way...
    "The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them."
    - Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

  10. #10
    Senior Member Flame*Angel's Avatar
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    I have mine out in the open under a pair of 250w MH as well as 4 VHO's and they're fine. I really don't think light affectst these guys one way or the other.

    I'm sure they'd do fine in a dark cave as they are in the ocean as long as you can replicate the oceans method of feeding as well. In nature they would locate where their feeding conditions are met, I doubt the fact that it's dark has as much to do with it as the availability of food, concentrated because of the cave. Also, there's probably little competition for real estate in dark caves.

    I prefer mine out in the open where they are easier to feed.
    Susan

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