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Thread: brain coral

  1. #1
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    brain coral

    does anybody know how long they will live…

  2. #2
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    sorry live?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Marty's Avatar
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    Brain corals shoud live for a long time. As long as your water quality is good, it will probably outgrow your tank. I have had mine for 3 years and it has doubled in size. They are relatively easy to care for but make sure that your Calcium and Alkalinity are at the correct levels.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Flame*Angel's Avatar
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    Most stony corals are pretty much imortal. They live as long as the conditions are good for them.
    Susan

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    I picked up a Metallic Green Dome Brian for my husband. I'm trying to find out about the lighting. I've read high light and to put it on the sand - other places say put them in the rocks near the lights. I'm confused. Today, I hope to have time to search some more and find out what is really required.

    Any suggestions?

    Vickie

    PS I didn't mean to highjack your thread.

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    Hello Vikki

    By your description I will hazard to guess that your coral is from one of the genus refered to as closed brains.(eg Favia ,Favites and so on) If this is the case and you say that it is metallic green then it most Likely will enjoy fairly bright light. By looking at your tank specs. and your lighting, I would place it on or near the bottom with moderate water flow.

    Stan

  7. #7
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    Thanks Stan. It's nice to see someone posting here that lives a little closer to me.

    I think I found the reason there are so many different recommendations for this brain. I found this "One interesting theory about the heavily iridescent, bright green coloration of "T. radiata" (AKA "metal dome" open brain coral) is that such pigmentation may be used to refract and amplify the weakly available light in said deep water. Contrary to the common belief that many coral proteins serve predominantly to reflect UV intense light away, some proteins are instead found below the zooxanthellae and serve to reflect light back to the symbiotic algae (Borneman, pers. comm.). This is consistent with anecdotal observations by many aquarists that the "metal dome" or "metallic" open brain coral favors weaker illumination (especially on import). Yet other aquarists have also reported the form to be quite hardy and tolerant of bright light with proper acclimation. " from http://www.wetwebmedia.com/trachyreproart.htm I stopped looking for tank conditions and followed a link for reproduction. It's amazing what is under reproduction some times. I guess it pays to check out all aspects of a coral.

    I'm beginning to think it is time to buy a good coral book instead of relying on the internet.

    Vickie

  8. #8
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    2 excellant books for corals, description and how to care for them are "Book of Coral Propagation" by Anthony Calso, and "Aquarium Corals" by Eric Borneman.
    The metallic green open brain is designed to radiate the light better because they are naturally found in more turbid waters such as a seagrass bed on the sand, and therefore they have to be able to concentrate the limited light that is shaded out by the grass better. For this reason, it is not recommended to have them in a too direct path of light or too intense. They are best placed on the soft sand ( never on the rockwork) and in a moderate light.

  9. #9
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    Thanks Toutouche, I'll check into those books.

    Vickie

  10. #10
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    Hello Vickie

    You say that its. a Trachyphyllia radiata never heard it call a dome coral (I hate common names LOL) This coals in the wild are always attached to a hard substraight, unlike T. geoffroyi which is free living. The T. radiata because its attached to a hard surface has to be removed by force when collected and you often can see marks under the coral where it was attached. T geoffroyi on the other hand once mature are free living and for the most part will be cone shaped on the bottom which they like to bury in a sandy bottom. If it is T radiata because they are more often found attached to the reef, placement just off the bottom might be best. these coral have many more folds to the tissue then T geoffroyi and can have a problem with the sediment if they are sitting directly in it. As for lighting they are pretty tolerante coral with your lighting in your tank fairly bright indirect light would do fine, with moderate water flow.

    Stan

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