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  1. #1
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    white nudibranch

    I found a white nudibranch in my tank today and was wondering if it is one that is reef safe or I should part with it?
    It is completely white with little pink rhinophores. It came in as a hitchiker and is quite cute actually!

  2. #2
    Senior Member aquamann's Avatar
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    lucky you

  3. #3
    Senior Member mouse6196's Avatar
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    Try this site...it might be one of these...

    http://www.hawaiisfishes.com/inverts.../neatslugs.htm
    The only thing two reef keepers will agree on, is what the third reef keeper is doing wrong!

  4. #4
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    Hey Mouse, I did find a picture of one that looks identical to the one in my tank...tried to post it previously but didn't work. I did a Google search and found it under "Jeff's Nudibranch Site and Coral Reef Gallery" it's the white nudibranch in the middle of the first set of pictures.

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  6. #6
    Senior Member mouse6196's Avatar
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    Here's a good quote about nudibranches...

    Nudibranchs

    Nudibranchs, also known as sea slugs, are some of the most beautiful and diverse creatures in the ocean, there are over 3000 described species worldwide.

    Nudibranchs are essentially snails without shells, and their name literally means "naked gill". In most species, the gills are prominently displayed on their dorsal surface. Some kinds of nudibranchs have a tuft of gills located on their backs at the posterior end, which are used only for respiration. Other kinds of nudibranchs have many finger-like structures on their backs called cerata, which function for gas exchange and often defense. Sea slugs have a pair of tentacles (called rhinophores) located on top of their heads, which biologists believe are used as sensory organs to assist in finding food and seeking a mate.Many nudibranchs are brilliantly coloured while others are subtly coloured to match their background, thereby providing camouflage.

    Nudibranchs are benthic organisms, meaning they live on the ocean bottom. They can be found crawling over rocks, seaweeds, sponges, corals and many other substrates. Sea slugs range from the lower intertidal zone to depths of over 700 m.

    All known nudibranchs are grazing carnivores and as a whole they feed on a wide variety of animals including sponges, hydroids, tunicates, anemones, corals, sea pens, bryozoans, barnacles, and sometimes other nudibranchs! Each species of nudibranch tend to be very selective feeders, and may only eat one certain prey species. Most nudibranchs have a ribbon of teeth called a radula, the structure of which is usually adapted to the animal's particular prey items. For example, many dorid nudibranchs (Suborder Doridacea) have broad radulae with numerous teeth for grazing on sponges, while most aeolid nudibranchs (Suborder Aolidacea) have narrow radulae and strong jaws for feeding on hydroids and bryozoans.

    Nudibranchs are simultaneous hermaphrodites, which means that they possess both male and female sex organs at the same time. This strategy increases the probability of finding a mate, since every mature individual of the same species is a potential partner (self-fertilizaNtion is very rare). After mating, nudibranchs lay their egg masses either on or near the organism on which they feed. These egg masses vary in shape, size and colour depending on species. Some sea slugs lay single coils of eggs, while others are in the shape of a thick ribbon wound into a spiral. The egg masses are often white, but they can also be red, pink, orange or any other colour depending on the species. Egg development can take between 5 and 50 days, and is strongly influenced by temperature. Warmer waters generally result in a shorter embryonic period. Usually the eggs develop first into a larval form called a veliger, which drifts in the ocean currents as plankton. Specific environmental conditions trigger the larvae to settle and metamorphose into the adult form. This larval dispersal is important in the successful exploitation of new areas, since adult nudibranchs move very slowly and cannot travel long distances.

    Since nudibranchs have lost their protective shells, they require alternative means of defense. The bright colouration seen in many species is believed to warn potential predators that the nudibranchs contain distasteful or even toxic compounds. Many of the dorid nudibranchs (Suborder Doridacea) are strongly scented, which is thought to be a chemical anti-predator warning. Many sea slugs feed on sea anemones and hydroids (Phylum Cnidaria), which contain stinging cells called nematocysts. The nudibranchs are able to block the discharge of these nematocysts during digestion, and they are then passed to special storage sacs in the cerata. The adopted stinging cells form part of a defensive mechanism against any predators that attempt to prey on the nudibranchs. Some nudibranchs can also swim short distances when disturbed by predators - they contract their body muscles and undulate through the water while flapping their cerata
    The only thing two reef keepers will agree on, is what the third reef keeper is doing wrong!

  7. #7
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    Wow, thanks Mouse, very educational! The nudi took off in the liverock and is no where to be seen, at least I got a glimps of it before it disappeared. Makes me wonder what other creatures are in the tank that I don't know about :eek2:

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