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  1. #1
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    soft coral meltdown

    Hi
    I was wondering if anyone has thoughts on the behaviour of my sinularia and kenya tree. They both seem to have shrunk down, and while they still have their color, there does not seem to be much difference from their appearance from when the lights are on or off. Water quality tests fine, pH 8.4, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate zero, Ca at 420. The other inhabitants are going great and multiplying (xenia, star polyp, mushrooms, zoos). I have turtle grass in the tank and assumed that the macroalgae was consuming Iodine etc so I dosed the tank with Kent essential elements, as well as a 20% water change. I've also tried moving these guys closer to the lights 10 inches from PC 165 watts (a 24" by 10" canopy). I tried everything I can think of, short of channelling Cousteau, does anyone have any ideas to try? Thanks

  2. #2
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    Firstoff, all corals don't like being moved and if they are, then they usually need some time to get used to the new surroundings.
    These corals like light and NOT too intense flow. Can you notice if any part of it is actually showing signs of necrotic tissue or obvious signs of something not being right?

  3. #3
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    My soft corals do that every few months, it was explained to me as a natural growth process. Watch them carefully like Toutouche said but also if this is the growth process when they do open they will shed a slime type stuff you will need to add carbon to keep water prims safe.
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  4. #4
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    Lotus,
    What you're referring to is called a "mucous tinic". However, Sinularia and Kenya trees do not do this. Usually, it'll be leathers or certain photosynthetic gorgs that do this.
    This mucous tunic is characterized by a "wet look" even though it is already underwater and I guess, well.., wet..
    They do this to shed the accumulated biofilm and algae that can grow on them hindering the nutrient gathering process from the light.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the ideas,
    I also checked the Wetwebmedia site and saw that one explanation could be allopathy (particularly from star polyp). I tried extra carbon and things look better today. At least the polyps are out on the Kenya tree. But exactly as mentioned above, the sinularia sloughed off a green coat of some kind. Seems to look healthy...but what do I know.
    John

  6. #6
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    Either I learned something new today, or it might not be a Sinularia that you have. It could be a type of leather instead. I have never seen a Sinularia shed a coat before, in other tanks or mine.
    Bottomline is that if it's looking better, then that's what counts.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Salty Steve's Avatar
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    I have a Pink Sinularia that does not shed mucous, but my Finger Leather does all the time, I'm thinkin' you might want to look at the polyps of the Sinularia because they are really different from a say Finger Leather...in my tank anyway, I have both.

  8. #8
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    Steve,
    I agree. Same with my corals...

  9. #9
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    Can someone please explain the adding of carbon for the softcorals? I have never heard of that. Is it a liquid? add weekly?

    My star polyps barely poke there heads out most days while the rest of the soft corals (Branch, Hammer...) are doing great, but I wonder if adding Carbon, would be of benefit and help to get the polyps going better? I use snow, and calcium additives weekly as part of a weekly 10% water change. More then willing to add Carbon if that would help things.

  10. #10
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    The carbon is granular. You either place it in a mesh bag and hang it somwehere in the sump to filter "passively" ( this way you can leave it in 24/7 and is what I do), or add it to a canister filter and filter "actively". This you do only from time to time.
    What it does is absorb many of the toxins and other whatnot chemicals that softies, leathers, etc.., release into the water. These chemicals hinder other types of corals from flourishing. This is also the reason why usually, a dedicated SPS tank won't have many., if any at all softies mixed in. Some people DO mix them up and say the tank is doing fine, but if that same tank were to be run with no softies at all, you would be able to see a difference ( By the way, I'm not looking to start another Softie/SPS mix tank war here..., just explaining what is a known fact documented many times over...).

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