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  1. #1
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    sand shifting starfish yes or no

    Just taking a curiousity poll
    1. Do you have one of these stars
    2.Had one and got it out of the tank
    3.didn't get one because of what they do to the sandbed


    I am trying to decide on weather or not to keep mine or not. I hear that they are not a good thing for the sandbed.

  2. #2
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    Lots of people use them ( I don't however), BUT..., if you want a functioning DSB, then they are a bad thing. They basically lve in the sand sifting through it looking for any type of microscopic life to eat. You WANT your sandbed to be alive with all kinds of squiggly things. This is what makes it a functioning bed. Leave them out, JMO... and lots of others too.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ALRHA's Avatar
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    i have one, i thought it was a good thing to keep the sand turning and eat any left overs in there. i didnt realize this was bad for the bed. should i remove it? what would i do with it? i would feel bad to kill it.

  4. #4
    ijo
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    I have one in my main setup aswell.. I really like their ability at keeping the sand looking clean... no problems at all with algae.

    If I had a chance to change it... I would throw 1-2 inch sand bed in the main tank (with the star) and a 4-6 inch in the refugium... this way you get the nice looking sandbed and benefits from the critters in your sump...

    IJO

  5. #5
    Senior Member ALRHA's Avatar
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    anything that can make them multiply faster than consumed?

  6. #6
    ijo
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    Welcome to Aquaria ALRHA (if I havent already welcomed you.. hehe)

    Not that I know of... You need a place for them to multiply without the threat of being eaten. A sump is your best bet if you are wanting to keep a sand sifting star in your main tank.

    There is still a ton of debate regarding these DSB's... with the sand sifting you essentially have no benefits from the deep sand bed other than for show IMO.

    IJO

  7. #7
    Senior Member ALRHA's Avatar
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    hey, thanks for that fishy welcome.
    So now, can i conclude from what you are saying, that having this sand sifting star makes it as if i have no dsb which means that i also would not run the risk of it crashing?
    If this is so, then we may have just solved the whole issue with the dsb.
    Correct me if I am wrong, but the logic stands as follows.
    1. A DSB is beneficial to the tank for various reasons based on many views.
    2. The downside the to DSB is that in the very long term, it may lead to a crash.
    3. The Sand Sifting Star essentially removes the "DSB system" from your tank.
    Conclusion:
    4. Putting a sand sifting star in a tank every year or so, would essentially disturb the DSB enough so as to remove the system and then it can start up again fresh. As such, the DSB will never be more than a year old and will not have the risks of crashing as an old DSB may be subject to.

    Let me know your thoughts on this.
    -Albert

  8. #8
    ijo
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    hehe ALRHA.. way to stir things up... I bet there will be a few members throwing in their 2 cents soon.

    1- I'm not sure its the DSB thats crashing the systems
    2- I guess if you take the casue out of the equation the chances on your tank crashing is eliminated. At the same time... your also taking out the known benefits from a DSB.
    3- I'm not totaly sure the Star will deplete the sand bed of the issues regarding to a DSB crash.

    You have an interesting point... if the sand star cleans your sand of critters(bad) but at the same time taking case of the things that would cause a crash(good)... maybe these guys are a sollution.

    IJO

  9. #9
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    Only issue is that like Mercury and other chemicals in the ocean the heavy metals are absorbed into the fat of the animal eating them. So then you have a sand sifting star that is "super saturated" with all the toxins from the sand bed. Once that sand star dies, most do within a few years. And you don't fish it out all the heavy metals are released back into the system. Now however in one big dose.

    The only way to get something that can't break down out of a closed system is by physically removing it from the system. Either but using a heavy metal sponge or if the sand sifter star is the way to go, by taking the star out of the tank every 6-12 months and getting a new one.
    ________
    Tanks: 400 gal Reef, 180 gal FOWLR, 300 gal Sump, 40 gal Frag Tray plumbed as one system - 900 gal total water volume.
    DIY Calcium Reactor, Nielson Reactor and Skimmer

  10. #10
    Senior Member ALRHA's Avatar
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    smart idea.
    (i guess u can donate him to the local fish store if u dont have the heart to flush a living animal)
    but is this something you know for a fact or just a theory?

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