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  1. #1
    CAT
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    Got quite a shock today

    Some of you might remember that I just posted a thread about my big move from Toronto to Nova Scotia and that I was relieved that almost all the critters survived.

    Well, these last 3 days with the massive power outage in N.S. (seven hydro towers down), I couldn't believe that the tank was going to have to go through another nasty event. Power went out at about 6:00am Sunday morning and did not return until about 6:00 pm monday night -- 36 hours of 0 degree weather outside with the temp in the house dropping the whole time. Hubby and I bailed to a motel about 1.5 hours away yesterday morning because the house was getting too cold to stay in, and we needed hot coffee and a hot shower. We are renting this place so no woodstove, no generator, no gas stove.

    I was heartsick when I left yesterday - I felt like I was abandoning my buddies in the tank. The news on the t.v. was so vague around this place that we didn't know,until this morning that the power had come back on last night. Anyway, this morning we packed up and headed home. I braced myself to face a huge mess in the tank and had the shock of my life when I opened the door, looked at the tank... and saw the ocellaris swimming around. Took a closer look and found the fire shrimp picking away at the rock! I couldn't believe it, they were swimming around and begging for food!

    Now, I have to say that some of the corals are having a rough time and I'm not sure how they'll fare in the end, but so far the cerith snail, the nassarius snails, the red-leg crab and some of the stomatella snails are still trucking around as well. There were some dead stomatella snails and amphipods in the refugium - maybe the much larger volume of l.r. in the display held the heat longer.

    All I was able to do for the tank when the power went out was add a battery operated air pump to the display and one to the refugium, and cover the display with a very heavy blanket. The temp in the house was 50 degrees yesterday morning when we left and I'm not sure what the temp of the tank was (I refused to look under the blanket and watch the clown dying) but it had been dropping steadily though the day.

    In any case, I'm thrilled. My little clown and fire shrimp that survived the big move when the other fish did not, seemed to have survived another challenge.. those guys have gotta be the toughest little critters in this province.

    I'll have to wait and see how it all comes out in the end. Hopefully, not nearly as badly as I'd imagined.

    For anyone interested, the battery operated air pumps I have are Hagen and they take 2 D batteries. I put fresh batteries in the pumps yesterday morning before I left and they're still going -- 38 hours and counting so far. Those things have been worth their weight in gold since I bought them for my first tank move 3 years ago. They also saved my tank when I was in Toronto during the big eastern seaboard power failure a couple of years ago.

    I haven't heard much news about other N.S. reefers. I know that some areas still don't have power but I'm keeping my fingers crossed that they are doing well.
    Don't take life too seriously; no one gets out alive.

    photo gallery: http://aquariacanada.com/PhotoPost/showgallery.php?ppuser=424

  2. #2
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    That's great new given what has gone on. Likely what saved them was that the temp change was gradual. Even warm water fish can survive in pretty cool surroundings as long as the change is not too abrupt.
    Rob

  3. #3
    Senior Member steve666's Avatar
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    good news. Im happy you dont live near me though, power outages seem to follow you around
    We need more Indians!

  4. #4
    Senior Member steve666's Avatar
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    you'd have thought by now the hydro company would have worked out how to lay cables underground, it must cost them millions in lost revenues, repairs etc. Or is that why i'm paying off ontarios hydro debt.
    We need more Indians!

  5. #5
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    Too much ROCK in Canada to put them under ground in Canada.
    Rob

  6. #6
    Senior Member steve666's Avatar
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    hhhhmmmmmmm maybe, theres an ample supply of basements
    We need more Indians!

  7. #7
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    thats true. However most homes are not build on rock and we have some control over the location. Even on softer ground they usually only dig down 1/2 to 2/3 of the required depth. then they use the material from the hole to back fill and slop away from the foundation. If they were to bury high voltage power lines they would need to go as straight as possible, rock or no rock. I am not sure how deep they would have to bury them but another high cost would be insulating them. High voltage lines overhead do not have insulation on them. In the ground they would have to. I do however agree.. the landscape would look a lot better without them and they would be protected from the wind, ice etc.
    Rob

  8. #8
    CAT
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    Originally posted by steve666
    good news. Im happy you dont live near me though, power outages seem to follow you around
    LOL, yeah, I'm starting to think I'm cursed... or the power companies in Canada are totally unreliable.

    Still, it's amazing at how much abuse some of these creatures can take and still survive.

    Rob, the report on the news was that the power bill would double or more if they tried to bury the cable, and most people would rather deal with the occasionaly outages than pay the extra cost.

    Actually, we would have survived very nicely if we'd been in our old house that we owned because we had wired in a generator, had a gas stove and a wood stove. We also had an overflow on the well so we could get water for the horses and ourselves. Renting is a pain, but as soon as the generators are back in stock (all sold out now of course), we'll be buying another one.

    Cherry
    Don't take life too seriously; no one gets out alive.

    photo gallery: http://aquariacanada.com/PhotoPost/showgallery.php?ppuser=424

  9. #9
    AC Partner MomRules's Avatar
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    CAT- I'm glad you came thru OK. i was thinking about you. We have a woodstove, and so I was able to put hot water bottles in my tank, It never got below 77. And George brought me a generator so I got 12 hours of heat and circulaltion in the middle of the 36 hours of no power, phew! it is so nice to have alocal hero! Last year about this time Barry and Aven recued me by bringing 40 gal of NSW from Halifax on a week night when I toxed my tank with zinc. ARRG Rules!
    Gail in Nova Scotia

  10. #10
    CAT
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    Sounds like all members of ARRG made out ok since I haven't heard any bad news. Cool!
    Don't take life too seriously; no one gets out alive.

    photo gallery: http://aquariacanada.com/PhotoPost/showgallery.php?ppuser=424

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