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  1. #1
    Senior Member steve666's Avatar
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    blue tang advice

    Hey Guys

    i picked up a blue tang yesterday, just wondering how long i should keep him in the hosppital tank b4 i can put him in the display.
    The hospital tank is only 30g and he isn't happy about being there.
    He has been hiding flat under a rock now for two days, although this evening he came out for two minutes too eat a couple of brine shrimp.
    i wish i had put him straight in the main tank as i feel this has caused him/her more stress than needed.
    We need more Indians!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Flame*Angel's Avatar
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    Take it from someone who has learned this the hard way. A month ago I brought home the most beautiful Pakistani butterfly you ever saw. Big, strong, perfect specimen. I put him straight into the main tank and applauded as he ate greedily. He's dead now and he took out 4 other fish with him. I had to tear apart my tank to get the survivors out and have been treating them all in a hospital tank ever since. They have to spend 8 weeks in there because that's how long it will take to get the amyloodinium (marine velvet) out of the main tank. They hate the stark surroundings but I have no choice, it's this or they all die.

    I've been in this hobby long enough to know better but I've been lucky for a long time, I guess it finally caught up with me. I had a lionfish in my quarantine tank so I skipped it. That will never happen again. I've had more than my fair share of disasters but this is the worst by far.

    Quarantine should be a bare minimum of 2 weeks, 4 weeks would be better. You don't do it for the new fish, you do it for the fish you already have. While he's in there watch for any warning signs, no matter how subtle don't be tempted to move him to the main tank if he shows any problems at all.

    Here are some things to watch for:

    - laboured breathing - rapid gill movement, this can be hard to notice but if you are watching for it and if you look at your healthy fish you'll know it when you see it.

    - raised scales - scales should lie flat and smooth, raised scales can be a sign of a parasite

    - spots - big or small, regular or irregular, any colour - they are all a bad sign

    - colour loss - overall or in patches

    - listlessness - healthy fish are active and aware of their surroundings and of you

    - cloudy fins - fins should be clear, transparent fins are the easiest to spot this on but even coloured fins can be cloudy

    - appetite - this can be tough with a new fish as they often won't eat the first few days but any fish that has been eating and then stops is not well

    - cloudy eyes - one or both eyes, check them often, always a bad sign

    - fin damage - melting looking fins or split fins, any fin damage that doesn't heal quickly, healthy fish heal almost like magic, fins that stay damaged are a sign of trouble

    - any sores, bumps, lumps, pimples, scratches - watch like a hawk, they may be a sign of a parasite or just a wound that could get infected

    - mouth - it's not common but sometimes a fish can have it's jaw broken with capture, it can get stuck in a net. A fish that has it's mouth constantly open could have a damaged jaw or lockjaw, both a bad sign.

    - sunken stomache - this could be a sign of just being underfed or it could be worms or parasites

    - red splotches or streaks - this is often blood under the skin, it can be very subtle with fine lines at first and then progress to splotches at the base of scales

    - eratic swimming - if a fish can't seem to stay upright there may be a swim bladder problem, this sometimes can be corrected but often not

    - scratching - fish rubs against the decorations or substrate, it could be just an itch but usually is a sign of something more

    - flashing - fish darts suddenly and eratically or seems to shake it's head like it's trying to shake something loose

    - watch for the poo - seriously, long stringy poo that hangs on is a sign that a fish is eating too much protein and may need a more varied diet, or it could be something more serious. Healthy fish poo is brownish and falls apart easily or else is soft and clumpy. White poo can be a sign of tainted food.

    - grossly enlarged gut - rare but also something to watch for

    If anyone can think of anything else that people should watch for in a new fish during quarantine please add it to this list. I think we would all be better aquarists if we learn to tell a healthy fish from a sick one. But remember - even if the fish passes all these tests, as my beautiful Pakastani did, that doesn't mean he isn't sick. It took 2 weeks before I knew something was wrong with my fish and by then he'd infected the whole tank.
    Susan

  3. #3
    Senior Member steve666's Avatar
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    thanks very much susan.
    We need more Indians!

  4. #4
    Mel
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    That is 1 incredible list! Thanks for the warning and the info Susan.

  5. #5
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    the most important thing to make sure is that the fish does not have ich and that it is eating well i would say. once it has been in the tank for at least a week.

  6. #6
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    I disagree . ICH is a rather easy to cure issue compared to bacterial infections and Coral fish disease. Bottom line .. QT your new stock for at least 4 weeks.
    Rob

  7. #7
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    Great list of things to watch for Susan.
    Pierre

  8. #8
    Senior Member Flame*Angel's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, I've been compiling this list as I researched to find out more about what my fish were going through. I have it printed off and placed in the shelf under my quarantine tank so that when I can start buying new fish again I can go over the list when the new fish are in quarantine.

    c_hemmerich - I don't mean to be argumentative but if you look at the lifecycle of the more common parasites one week just isn't long enough to know if a fish is sick. One week after I purchased my Pakastani butterfly there was still no sign of trouble. He probably came with just a few parasites in his gills, not enough to bother him and not anything that I could see. However, when those few parasites dropped off in their next phase and each one became 200+ and then started looking for new hosts, then the problem was obvious.
    Susan

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