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  1. #1
    Senior Member ALRHA's Avatar
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    Pinnate Batfish (Pinnate Platax)

    I know this is an extremely hard to keep fish, but my LFS has one that has survived the shipping and is already eating well (he eats at least 3-4 times / day).
    I will be willing obviously to go out of my way and feed this fish as often as is neccessary and provide the best care for it.

    My question is, is this fish Reef Safe? there does not seem to be a lot of information on it around, and i just want to make sure that it would be reef safe before i bring it home.

    i know many people will object to my purchasing this fish, but half the battle in keeping this fish alive is getting it to eat after the shipping, and this one is already eating. Furthermore, it will have a much better chance of surviving in my 200 gallon tank than it will in the small tank at the fish store. i just want to make sure it will be reef safe and not eat my shrimps, crabs, snails, or corals.
    Albert
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  2. #2
    Senior Member volitan's Avatar
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    From what i know those fishies feeds on algae ,jellyfish and other gelatinous zooplankton.....
    Derik...

  3. #3
    Senior Member volitan's Avatar
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    heres another little passage from bob fenner

    "Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus 11758), the Pinnatus, Red-Stripe or Shaded or Dusky Batfish proves almost impossible to keep alive, generally refusing all food. This species is secretive in the wild, found hiding in wrecks and other dark spots, and should be left there. In my estimation, less than one hundredth of pinnatus bats live more than a month in captivity. I can hear it now; "Oh Bob, I know of a guy who kept a pinnatus for years, in low specific gravity, feeding it banana chips...". There are very few of these success stories, I'll warrant. the pinnatus, red-stripe or shaded batfish proves almost impossible to keep alive, generally refusing all food. This species is secretive in the wild, found hiding in wrecks and other dark spots, and should be left there. In my estimation, less than one hundredth of pinnatus bats live more than a month in captivity. I can hear it now; "Oh Bob, I know of a guy who kept a pinnatus for years, in low specific gravity, feeding it banana chips...". There are very few of these success stories, I'll warrant. Juvenile image on the FAQ's page. Below: a series of ages, sizes: Two juveniles in captivity (for a short time), sub-adult in captivity, and an older individual off of Queensland, Australia. "
    Derik...

  4. #4
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    very Beautiful fish and one of my all time favs. However they are very very difficult to keep for any length of time. They don't do well if there is any competition in the tank for food. They are just too slow moving. They also tend to damage their fins often if not given a LOT of open space to move around in.
    Rob

  5. #5
    Senior Member ALRHA's Avatar
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    see, it seems that the main difficulty with them is in the feeding, i feel that if he is already eating, then this can be the rare one that is willing to eat in captivity (and an offer i should not pass up). my tank is 30" deep and it is currently in a tank that is probably 18" deep, so he should have enough height to swim around and not hurt his fins.
    my only fear would be to see him survive well and end up having some expensive dinners in my tank.

    One Salty, your avatar gives away yourappreciation of this particular fish.
    Albert
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  6. #6
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    remember that this fish is a slow eater and may have trouble feeding if you have fast eaters such as tangs. jmo

  7. #7
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    Or a Crosshatch!!!!!!!

  8. #8
    Senior Member ALRHA's Avatar
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    he he, when i feed, the food scatters all over the tank and everyone gets to eat. i usually feed the tang and corsshatch separately (they eat the Jumbo Pellets or cubes of frozen food) then i add flakes or zooplankton that spreads around with the currents and everyone gets enough to eat (all the little guys you see in my footer).
    i just hope that if he is still hungry, he doesnt get in the mood for clam.
    Albert
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  9. #9
    Senior Member volitan's Avatar
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    By the info avaiilable I dont think they would much on your corals......did you check RC if anybody has hAD any personal experience with them?
    Derik...

  10. #10
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    Both Scott Michaels and Wetwebmedia both say that this fish should only be kept in a fish-only tank since it does eat corals and anemones.

    They also say that these fish don't move well between tanks which suggests that even if it is eating at the LFS, it may not continue to eat when moved to your own tank.
    Nick

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