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  1. #1
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    Unhappy looking for INTERCEPTOR

    anyone have a link or connection or even the pills. thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member Marty's Avatar
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    I would try a local veterinarian's office. I think that you can only get it by prescription through the vet's office. If you let them know what you are trying to do, I figure that they will sell you some.

  3. #3
    Moderator Krugar's Avatar
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    If you don't have a regular vet, let me know. Ours is pretty cool about the wierd requests I've had over the years.

    I doubt you'll have a problem though, as I understand it Interceptor is a miticide & not something likely to be abused.

    Cheers!
    There is nothing so permanent as a temporary measure.

  4. #4
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    thanks guys.

  5. #5
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    heres a good read.I knew Eric Borneman has conducted actual scientific studies of these "red bugs," so I contacted him. He sent me this information and I have his permission to quote it. I've highlighted some of the important points (IMO):



    quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    These are true parasites of Acropora. They are amphipods, probably of the genus Tegastes, but not T. acroporanus (5th maxilliped is different) - and probably undescribed. They are Acropora-specific, and I have tried to get them to host on various Montipora, Porites, Pocillopora and Pavona. They die and will not go onto these corals. They only parasitize Acroporids with enough coenosteum to move around (not the A. millepora type). I suspect they would get eaten. They sometimes can inhabit Acropora without causing much damage, or they can damage them to the point they die. They will die without a host in typically 3 days, though I have had some show signs of life (barely twitching, unable to swim) at five days. They swim well, and if you take a coral out of the tank, some hunker down tightly to the coral, others bail off and swim to another. They will not live in the tank without a host, though. They are direct developers, so no larval stage to worry about (females have a brood pouch, I got nearly 20 from 5 adults after two weeks).

    Interceptor works very well, even at 5 x recommended dose (Dustin Dorton), and does not seem to affect corals at all, even after 24 hours at 5x dose. Thus, it is "coral safe' but is not "reef safe." It kills all crustaceans we have seen - other amphipods, crabs, shrimps, etc. It kills polychaetes. It kills at least some snails (small Trochids). If you treat the tank, say goodbye to all those things, and if the populations of those things are large, you could have a major nutrient issue when all the worms, etc. die (at the very least). I would recommend you treat the affected corals outside the tank, and then wait the three to five days before putting them back in the tank. Examine all colonies closely with a lens to be sure there are no stragglers. I have not seen the need to do three treatments as has been suggested - that was based on the assumption there was a larval phase, which there isn't. But, the Acro crabs are going to be an issue. You could try to get them out - maybe freshwater dip to get them to bail?? But, that might stress the corals a lot. I don't know what to tell you on that one.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    In reply, I asked if my corals were definitely doomed if I don't do something. His reply:

    quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    No - it seems some people/tanks/corals can tolerate them - maybe reduced growth, etc but the colonies survive at least over an unknown amount of time....Not sure what happens long term as I have never followed any chronic infestations with hosts that do not show obvious effects. I'll share something with you - I had one colony in my tank that had them and I never knew it. Been there for years, no other colonies affected. Always wondered why it failed to really take off, and I got rid of the bugs and it is growing faster. No other colonies...how weird is that?
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    I asked if in his studies, did he see any evidence that the Acropora w/ commensal crabs within the colony did NOT have red bugs, and whether he thought the crabs might eat the bugs and if any natural predators were known. His reply:

    quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I have heard that, too, and have seen colonies with crabs and infestations. I have not noticed any colonies (out of several hundred) who were not infested with a crab surrounded by infested colonies without a crab. However, the actions of the crabs is right on line with what would be suspected as one of their roles - grooming the coral surface. They do this, and effectively. I wouldn't be surprised if this was the case or if they moderated infestations at the least, but I have not found it to be the case with the corals I worked with.

    Hard to say - given that they are an undescribed species! I have heard of a pipefish that eats them - perhaps butterflyfish? Shrimps? Dunno. There is undoubtedly one or many that do eat them as they do not seem to be extremely problematic in wild colonies. Andy Bruckner saw something he says might have been these amphipods in Fiji Acroporids right after a mass bleaching event, but don't know if they were the same bugs or not - no samples taken
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    My personal take at this time is that I will remove and treat the corals I can easily remove that are infested, but I will not do a systemic treatment of the whole tank. My tank has never looked better and I am getting nice coral growth and good night time extension of polyps on most corals. I don't think it is wise to risk a complete upset of my ecosystem (not to mention the bioload of dying critters) by possibly killing off the majority of my detritus eaters in one fell swoop.

    If I contribute to a future frag swap or raffle, I guess I'll mark my bags w/ a big red bug if the frag is an Acropora...

    Cheri


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    01/28/2005 02:59 PM

    prodman
    half empty or half full?

    Registered: Jan 2004
    Location: napa,ca
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    Thanks Cheri that is helpful.

    Hobby Experience: sometimes good other times not so good. But I ain't quittin yet

  6. #6
    Senior Member Fisherman's Avatar
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    so pretty much his study is inconclusive? or mixed results..

    either they kill or stunt the growth or have no effect at all?

    but don't treat your full tank is what i got out of it..

  7. #7
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    Cool

    mark reread it. The Interceptor itself kills the mites for sure. leaving them alone will cause the symptoms specified. low or no polyp extension can cause afflicted acros to basically starve to death. I have 2 of the same corals in my tank and one of them is infected. you can really tell

  8. #8
    Senior Member Fisherman's Avatar
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    yes i agree about the interceptor killing the mites aswell as shrimps/crabs etc... but doesn't he say that sometimes the don't bother the acros.. and sometime hey do which only stunts the growth.. then he says sometime they are so severe that they kill the acro..

    so pretty much you have to do what you have to do lol.. which in your case the acro is bleaching?? which sucks..

  9. #9
    Moderator Krugar's Avatar
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    I'd back up the last part of not treating your tank.

    I did some digging & the active ingredient is milbemycin oxime, which basically kills worms (heart worm, round worm, hook worm, and whip worms speicffically) That means anything related to a worm in your display tank is going to be in trouble.

    Then since as a side affect it seems to kill crustations you need to worry about your crabs & shrimp.

    I don't know how many acros you have, do you have the space & light to set them up in a hospital tank for a week or so?

    Cheers!
    There is nothing so permanent as a temporary measure.

  10. #10
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    Well that's good news for you Johnny and a great reference for others.
    Rob

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