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Thread: waterchange

  1. #1
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    waterchange

    i read a thread on RC where a moderator(randy) recommend changing the water by using two small pumps, one to remove the old water and another to add the new water, to change the water at the same time. He also stated that changing the water this way is far easier on the tank and that it is almost as efficient as changing the water the normal way. i want to try this but was just worried that doing it that way u would be taking some of the new water out with the old one but randy assured me that u only lose a very small smount of the new water. does that sound right? anyone else change their water this way?
    Vu

  2. #2
    Moderator cres's Avatar
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    I haven't done it.

    One other thing to add is that if you don't have too much churning in your tank at the time, you can have your new water 1 degree cooler than the tank. It will tend to sink, until it heats up or gets churned. So, if you take water from the top and add cooler water near the bottom, you should dispose of even less new water.

    Again, I haven't tried it myself, but, it is something I read.
    Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

  3. #3
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    I think the dilution effect that would see new water removed with the old would depend on the size of the water change compared to the tank. A 10% change of the tanks volume with new water in on one side of the tank and old out at the other would be OK. This is based on both pumps running at the same time.
    Rob

  4. #4
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    How often must one execute a water change? Is this dependent on water test kit results?

    My roommate successfully maintains a 90G marine tank & only rarely does he perform a water change.
    kate

  5. #5
    Moderator Krugar's Avatar
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    Really depends on the tank, the equipment, the bioload, and the abilites of the person running it.

    A really experienced person can look at their tank & know without testing it's time for a waterchange & some people play it that way.

    Somebody less experienced, or wanting to be more cautious will have a schedule for the tank, built up around water quality tests.

    But I'd say most people do a 90G tank at lest once a month.

    Cheers!
    There is nothing so permanent as a temporary measure.

  6. #6
    Moderator cres's Avatar
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    Generally, you shouldn't wait for the parameters to tell you when to change the water. You want to maintain good numbers throughout the life of the tank.

    If your Nitrate is rising between water changes, you should address that problem. You shouldn't see any Ammonia or Nitrite between water changes.

    On a mature system, it isn't likely to suddenly spike and the system will tolerate less and fewer water changes, but, you will either have to supplement more minerals, or, you will start to see less growth (which might be okay on a mature tank).

    Success is also a subjective quality. A low standard of success might be "the floor is hardly ever wet" another might be "my Gorg has tripled in size in the last week alone".

    10-15% every two months is a low reasonable level of water change. 10% per week is a little high. You should probably aim for the minimum it takes to maintain a healthy tank -- whatever that happens to be for your system.
    Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

  7. #7
    Moderator Krugar's Avatar
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    Absolutely cres, but the only way you're going to learn if your tank needs a water change more frequently than you planned on is if you've noticed something isn't quite right.

    An experienced aquarist can tell that the coral or fish are showing signs of stress, or just "know" something's amiss.

    Somebody that's not there yet will need to perform tests.

    IMHO it's a learning process for each tank. You "estimate" where to start & test to make sure nothing is going wrong.

    Cheers!
    There is nothing so permanent as a temporary measure.

  8. #8
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    I do a 10% every 2 weeks like Cres said better to not wait for parameters to change.

  9. #9
    Moderator Krugar's Avatar
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    I'm not advocating doing a partial only when your numbers are off. I agree completely that the goal is to have a schedule that keeps your water clean.

    But how does a begginer set up that schedule?

    Each tank is different & what works for my tank will need to be adjusted & scaled for your tank ad naseaum.

    Do a partial every X is a guide line. I'm saying that a begginer needs to test their water to see if every X is working or if they need to do a partial at X-1 etc.

    Cheers!
    There is nothing so permanent as a temporary measure.

  10. #10
    Moderator cres's Avatar
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    Absolutely.

    I can pretty much quarantee that if you to a 50% water change daily, you will never see any Nitrate in your system. But, unless you are running a 0.5 gallon nano, this will bankrupt you very quickly.

    Alternately, if you never do a water change, everything had best be perfect: nutrient export, trace mineral addition, etc.

    The middle ground, where most of us set up our tents, has to start somewhere and adjust with changing conditioins. For example: the 1" Hippo tang you added a year ago, that is now 7" long, needs more food and is a much greater bioload than it was to start. The exact right maintenance a year ago might need to be adjusted along the way.

    Tests will confirm that you are doing it well enough or not. I'm certainly not advocating not testing.

    The problem is that there are hundreds of trace elements in salt water and we only have tests for maybe 15 of them. And only a few of those 15 within reasonable pricing.
    Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

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