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Thread: Chili coral

  1. #1
    Senior Member mschmied's Avatar
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    Chili coral

    Does anyone have experience with Chili corals, what I am wondering is if they will be ok even if they are not kept in the dark.
    HermitCrab

  2. #2
    Senior Member mickyfin's Avatar
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    No first hand experience but I lifted the following from Wet Web Media. A search there should yield more info.

    "... coral is commonly referred to as "chili coral". It is in the family of Nepthyigorgia (thanks Anthony). It is aposymbiotic (NON-photosynthetic) and therefore needs to be fed (heterotrophic). Pretty hardy coral as far as heterotrophic corals go. They occur naturally in overhangs (hang it upside down), with a heavy current of water to bring food to its extended polyps. I would try rotifers and maybe fresh hatched baby brine (Artemia nauplii). Sometimes pureed meaty foods (used sparingly) might also help meet it's nutritional needs. A refugium is your best bet though. Nice picture by the way. Look on page 298-299 in Anthony Calfo's "Book of Coral Propagation Vol. 1" for more information"
    Don't Panic Feel free to visit my blog -> Internet Tough Guy.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Zookeeper's Avatar
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    I had one for a time, and then traded it for some Ricordia Florida. As Mickyfin pointed out, they are non-photosynthetic, and don't really care whether it is light or dark. Cyclopeze seemed to excite mine.

  4. #4
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    That sounds like a really big challenge. You could really trash out the rest of your tank trying to feed it enough to keep it alive. It will work for a while until your tank absorbs all the nutrients it can, then there will be algae everywhere.


    Those are tough corals to keep in a closed system. They sure look cool though.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Ricepicker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zookeeper
    I had one for a time, and then traded it for some Ricordia Florida. As Mickyfin pointed out, they are non-photosynthetic, and don't really care whether it is light or dark. Cyclopeze seemed to excite mine.
    lol... excite...

    i never seen a chili coral, nor can i find pics.. can u post one and indulge the rest of us?

  6. #6
    Senior Member mschmied's Avatar
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    I will try cyclopeze and Brine Shrimp naupili see if I get a feeding response.
    HermitCrab

  7. #7
    Moderator Krugar's Avatar
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    Hey Mario,

    I have some golden pearls, phyto, & rots if you want to try them & you don't mind the excruciating commute.

    Cheers!
    There is nothing so permanent as a temporary measure.

  8. #8
    Senior Member piatchie's Avatar
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    Had one for a while! Poor thing never made ot though! I think there destined to die in an aquarium. Best of luck if you have already gotten it! Post a pic and keep us updated!
    :fish3:Piatchie:fish3:

    Why is it called "cargo" when it goes by ship, and "shipment" when it goes by car?

  9. #9
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    This coral will not last long..., no matter WHAT you do!! It is one of those corals that should not be available to buy, period. It is completely non photosynthetic and what light it "does" get, will only make it go downhill faster by helping alage to grow on it's surface. This in turn blocks the polyps from being able to extend to feed the coral. Even if you "did" manage to get it to open up and inflate, the particular food it needs is very specific as far as size "and" meaty substance..., along with the proper flow rate of current passing by it to allow it to catch the food. These corals grow in caves and among overhangs in nature and always in direct flow of a current going through some sort of passage way.
    If AND when yours starts to grow alage on it, the best way to help it is to move it to the sump and direct a powerhead right at it from only a couple inches away ( this should give you an idea of the amount of current it needs). The powerhead should also be moved around it regularly so that it gets flow from all sides and constantly. This will low the algae off of it and "hopefully" keep it clean. Nowever, as soon as you remove the powerhead or place it back in your tank, the samething will happen over again..., algae will start to cover it all over.
    My advice is get rid of it while you can..., unfortunately, as they are indeed a pretty coral.

  10. #10
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    Toutouche, hope all is well with you, Damn thats not what I wanted to hear lol I am intrigued with these hard to keep corals. Why is it that the most colorful and beautifull corals have to be so hard to keep,ie: carnation corals, chili corals,etc. I was in at MS yesterday and have been wanting a carnation coral for so long lol, Keith looked at me with a huge smile and said well it is one of the most difficult. I responded with well my Sea pen is doing ok and so are my sun corals (btw thx Khoa, #2 is doing great). I keep rubbing it in to Keith re: the Sea Pen after he told me wait and see if its still alive after 6 mths, am presently at mth 5. I came sooooooooo close to buying a carnation yesterday, but didnt.

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